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New arrest of a journalist contributing to reformist websites

first_img News Reporters Without Borders condemned a renewed crackdown on the online press after the 10 October arrest of Omid Memarian on the orders of the 9th chamber of the Tehran prosecutor’s office, for posting articles on several reformist sites. Three more journalists are already in custody for the same reasons. Reporters Without Borders condemned a renewed crackdown on the online press after the 10 October arrest of Omid Memarian on the orders of the 9th chamber of the Tehran prosecutor’s office, for posting articles on several reformist sites. Three more journalists are already in custody for the same reasons.”In a country where the independent press has to fight for its survival on a daily basis, online publications and weblogs are the last media to fall into the authorities’ clutches. With eight months to go before the presidential elections, the Iranian authorities are now trying to spread terror among online journalists,” the organisation said.Omid Memarian, Shahram Rafihzadeh, Hanif Mazroi and Rozbeh Mir Ebrahimi are accused of “propaganda against the regime, threatening national security and incitement to rebellion and insulting leading figures in the regime.”Spokesman for the Iranian Justice Ministry, Jamal Karamirad, has said the journalists will shortly go on trial in Tehran. Their families have not been allowed to see them since their arrests and they have been denied legal representation.All four were referred to in an article in the conservative daily Kayhan, attacking support from certain foreign governments for a “network of webloggers seeking to overthrow the regime”.Former reformist deputy, Mohssen Armin, said that around 20 people, not just journalists, had been arrested in a “crackdown against Internet use”.Shahram Rafihzadeh, head of the cultural section of the reformist daily newspaper Etemad (Confidence), was arrested on 7 September 2004, apparently by the morals police, a Tehran police department that is linked to the intelligence services.Hanif Mazroi, former journalist on several reformist publications, was arrested after responding to a summons from the 9th chamber of the Tehran prosecutor’s office on 8 September.Rozbeh Mir Ebrahimi, former political editor of Etemad was arrested at his home in Tehran on 27 September 2004.Babak Ghafori Azar, arrested on 7 September 2004 suspected of contributing to reformist news sites, was released on 21 September. Organisation News IranMiddle East – North Africa to go further Call for Iranian New Year pardons for Iran’s 21 imprisoned journalists Help by sharing this information Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 IranMiddle East – North Africa Follow the news on Iran After Hengameh Shahidi’s pardon, RSF asks Supreme Leader to free all imprisoned journalists June 9, 2021 Find out more October 14, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 New arrest of a journalist contributing to reformist websites March 18, 2021 Find out more RSF_en News News Receive email alerts February 25, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Energy healing workshop in Limerick

first_imgVanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Facebook Advertisement TAGSAngel TimeslimerickSoulways Therapy Twitter NewsLocal NewsEnergy healing workshop in LimerickBy Alan Jacques – February 28, 2015 1230 Previous articleLimerick hotelier sets sights on tourism growth targetsNext articleHope is on the menu at Adare luncheon Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Linkedin Email Printcenter_img Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ANGEL Times on Limerick’s Thomas Street will host a primordial energy healing workshop from Soulways Therapy on Thursday, March 5.  Primordial energy healing involves looking at beliefs that are intermeshed energetically with our inner maternal and paternal archetypes. This city workshop will use somatic meditation and energetic healing tools to clear old inherited belief systems. The workshop will run from 7 to 8pm and tickets cost €15. For more details log onto www.soulwaystherapy.com WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival last_img read more

Orsted remains focused on U.S. offshore wind market

first_imgOrsted remains focused on U.S. offshore wind market FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Wall Street Journal:Danish energy company Ørsted A/S is considering a bid for several U.S. offshore-wind projects and already has the required funding in place, the company’s finance chief said.“There are a lot of auctions coming up in the U.S.,” said Ørsted Chief Financial Officer Marianne Wiinholt in an interview Friday with CFO Journal. “We feel we are well-positioned.”The U.S. would be key to Ørsted’s efforts to grow its global footprint. The company has installed about 25% of the installed offshore-wind capacity in the world, according to Marcus Bellander, an analyst at Nordea Bank AB.Earlier in August, Ørsted made its first major investment in the U.S. when it agreed to buy Lincoln Clean Energy LLC, a Chicago-based onshore wind and solar company, for $580 million.Bidding for capacity in the U.S. is next on the agenda. Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey each plan to select a bidder for offshore-wind projects in the coming quarters. Connecticut is set to announce the winner of a zero-carbon energy project in the next few months. The company hasn’t made a decision on which U.S. projects it will target. “We are looking into all of them,” Ms. Wiinholt said.The CFO’s comments come after Ørsted lost out in an auction in Massachusetts in May. It was a major setback in its quest to enter the U.S. market. “This was unexpected,” Mr. Bellander said.More ($): Denmark’s Ørsted plans to bid on new U.S. offshore-wind projectslast_img read more

SPECIAL REPORT: When avian flu control meets cultural resistance

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second of a two-part special report on bird flu in Vietnam. Part one, “Vietnam’s success against avian flu may offer blueprint for others,” appeared Oct 25.Oct 26, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – HANOI, Vietnam – Nguyen Van Tich’s farm lies at the end of a narrow dirt road that runs under the tall edges of rice paddies and snakes between old bomb craters turned into fish ponds.The tucked-away property, one of the largest in this 10,000-person district 20 miles from Hanoi, is new-looking and prosperous. In the 7 years they have owned it, 44-year-old Tich and his wife have stocked their 1.75 acres with citrus trees, coconut palms, pig pens, a duck pond, and a long brick coop filled with fuzzy chicks that skitter away from a stranger’s shadow.The couple went into debt to build the farm, and their care for their investment shows in the wire mesh that swathes the chicks’ shelter and the vaccinations recently administered to their 1,000 ducks and hens—measures prescribed by Vietnam’s central government to contain the threat of H5N1 avian influenza.”I am a professional; [this farm] is my life,” Tich said through an interpreter. “If I lose it, I lose everything.”The willingness of Tich, pictured at right,* and thousands of small farmers like him to follow the government’s orders does much to explain Vietnam’s dramatic change of fortune on avian flu, from one of the countries hardest hit by the virus to one of the most successful in controlling it (see part one of this series).The Vietnamese government is openly proud of those results, and international animal and human health experts have applauded its apparent success. Yet some of those experts caution, and interviews with farmers and consumers confirm, that Vietnam’s continued success is not guaranteed—because it may depend on new and stricter government prescriptions that the populace may find hard to accept.”What is being talked about is trying to change really basic behavior that people have been engaged in all their lives,” said Dr. Richard Brown, a World Health Organization (WHO) epidemiologist based in Hanoi. “It is going to be a slow process.”As the H5N1 outbreak expands, planners worldwide are acknowledging that scientific and political efforts to control the virus will fail unless they are accompanied by willing cultural change. Vietnam’s attempts to create that change are being closely watched.A model for successVietnam’s success against avian flu has made the country an island of viral suppression in a sea of transmission—this year, according to reports from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), H5N1 has recurred in neighboring Cambodia, China, Laos, Myanmar, and Thailand.And Vietnam’s successful measures are stringent and strictly maintained.In Ho Chi Minh City, for instance, raising chickens in the city has been banned, and chickens raised in the countryside are inspected twice before they cross the city limits—once by rural authorities and a second time at one of four municipal checkpoints. More than 2,000 trucks pass through the checkpoints each day; if the birds’ paperwork is in order, the truck carrying them is allowed to proceed along limited designated routes to one of three new slaughterhouses.If the birds do not pass inspection, they are confiscated on the spot. “We take them to the incinerator,” Dr. Truong Thi Kim Chau, vice-director of the city’s sub-department of animal health, said through an interpreter.The country’s health authorities do not take success for granted.”The risk of bird flu still exists in Vietnam,” said Dr. Bui Quang Anh, the Hanoi-based director general of the department of animal health in the agriculture ministry, pointing to the likelihood that the virus still circulates in ducks, geese, and quail within Vietnam, and the possibility of its being carried over the Chinese border in smuggled live chickens.Strict additional measuresTo counter that perceived threat, the ministry proposes strict additional prevention measures in its Integrated National Operational Program for Avian and Human Influenza, known because of its binding as the “Green Book.”The measures vary. One proposal is to permanently ban the raising of ducks, an integral component of the rice-growing economy because they are herded into harvested paddies to clean and fertilize them. Another is to take poultry raising out of the hands of the backyard growers, who make up 70% of producers, and concentrate the industry in large, biosecure farms.Most controversially, for many Vietnamese, the government proposes to alter the way that chicken, a major food, changes hands. It is phasing out the markets where consumers choose live birds and have them slaughtered, and substituting birds killed in a modern slaughterhouse and sold shrink-wrapped and chilled in supermarkets.The change—already instituted in Ho Chi Minh City and under way in the north—would alter much more than basic commerce. It challenges deep-rooted food preferences, because already-dead chickens are considered less tasty and nutritious. It could affect social patterns, because markets are where neighbors meet each morning. It touches even religious practice: Slaughtering and cooking chicken on behalf of family ancestors is a crucial observance during Lunar New Year.”This is the big challenge in Vietnam,” said Dr. Le Truong Giang, vice-director of Ho Chi Minh City’s health department. “Not all the population agree, but more and more people agree with us.”But in Hanoi, Tran Thi Tuyet—a university graduate working in a silk shop to perfect her English—vigorously disagreed.”We know bird flu is very dangerous,” she said. “But Vietnamese people, we like to go to the market, we want to see the birds. Where I live, outside the city, there are many markets selling chickens still.”Meeting cultural resistanceIn Vietnam’s health agencies, and in the cities and villages, there are scattered signs that acceptance of anti-bird flu measures may not be complete.The two-shot poultry vaccination campaign mandated last year by the agriculture ministry inoculated approximately 160 million birds—80% of the country’s total—in late 2005, Dr. Anh said. But a repeat this year, meant to catch a new crop of birds, vaccinated 140 million, about 65%. And a campaign to halve the country’s duck population, which stood at 60 million in 2003, has stalled at 40 million birds.”We are thinking of how to change the jobs of the duck farmers in the countryside,” Dr. Anh said. “The farmers are very poor. We should have something else for them to do.”On a mid-September morning in Viet Doan commune—where 1,500 ducks were culled in 2005—400 local farmers followed along eagerly as a team from CARE International staged games and contests with an anti-flu theme. The gathering was part of a program that the humanitarian agency has been testing in Vietnam since 2004 that coaches rural residents to evaluate their own understanding of avian flu and teaches them preventive measures, from handwashing to keeping poultry away from other animals.”Some food shops in the commune have stopped selling poultry meat or duck’s blood,” said Dr. Nguyen Thi Tuyet Mai, a trainer on the program’s staff. “Some farmers keep their poultry behind a fence. But it is difficult to change behavior; it requires a long time.”Tich, the farmer, did not attend the gathering. At his farm down the road, there was a modest fence, two strands of barbed wire slung loosely between low posts. A chicken flapped over it, landing clumsily in a mob of month-old ducklings (see left*)—ducklings that, under a strict interpretation of government guidelines, should not exist.Asked about the ducks, Tich looked nonplussed. News of the ban, he said, had reached him only 10 days ago; he had bought the ducks 3 weeks before.”What I heard is, the local authority just encouraged not to raise new ducks.” he said through the interpreter. “It is not a policy.”Tich had complied with most of the policies in the government campaign against avian flu. In addition to vaccinating his adult birds and confining his chicks until they are a month old, he scours his chicken coops with disinfectant every time a crop is sold, wears gloves and a mask when he kills a bird for his own use, and buries dead chickens in a hole with lime instead of eating them or feeding them to fish.But he seemed skeptical of the effort and expense in some of the further measures yet to come.”Avian influenza is a very big concern for our family, because we have invested quite a lot of capital in our poultry,” he said. “But if the government banned duck-raising, I might switch to raising other animals. I might not grow poultry anymore.”*Photos ©2006 Maryn McKenna. Used with permission.Reporting for this story was supported by the East-West Center, Honolulu (www.eastwestcenter.org).last_img read more