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Relay for Life celebrates amazing €125,000 total for 2019 – Picture Special

first_imgThe Relay for Life committee has announced that an incredible €125,196.54 was raised for the Irish Cancer Society at this year’s event.The charity group presented a cheque to Mark Mellett of The Irish Cancer Society at a team celebration evening in the Mount Errigal Hotel on Monday.Relay for Life Donegal’s successful summer event brought the community together again to fundraise for vital research and services of the Irish Cancer Society. Money raised is spent locally, including support and care for cancer patients and their families and a clinical research programme at Letterkenny University Hospital. The Relay for Life team has thanked every person who was involved in the 2019 event and made it a success, including team members, entertainers, volunteers and many more individuals and businesses.The 2020 Relay for Life Donegal date has now been set for Saturday 23rd and Sunday 24th of May 2020 and planning is already underway for next year.See all the photos by Clive Wasson from the cheque presentation here:Optum’s Super Heroes Amanda McFadden and Anne Marie Gallagher with Seamus Murphy, Drew Corry and Robert O’Connor at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonKelly’s Centra, Letterkenny presenting their cheque at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonRelay for Life Committee members with the €125,196.54 raised at this year’s Relay For Life at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel from left are Seamus Devine, Eimear Kavanagh, Seamus Quinn, Ena Barrett, Seamus McBride, Seamus Murphy, Donal Kavanagh and Drew Corry.Photo Clive WassonRobert O’Connor speaking at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonMembers of the Kernans Team who raised €10,000 at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonPrancers Agains Cancer present their cheque at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonCathy’s Team Members with Robert O’Connor and Charlie Quinn at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonThis years figure of €125,196.54 is revealed at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonMark Mellett, Head of Fundraising receives the cheque for €125,196.54 from Drew Corry, Relay for Life Donegal Treasurer at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonMark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society receives the cheque for €125,196.54 from Drew Corry, Relay for Life Donegal Treasurer with Teams at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonEntertainers from the Relay For Life at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Front from left are Andrew McBrearty, Denis Curran, Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society Paddy Bradley and Oisin Bradley. Back from left are Paul McCahal, Caolin, Aidan Murphy, Conor McLaughlin, Hilary Anne Heatherington, Amy Meehan and Charlie Collins. Photo Clive WassonUlster Tyres group at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonEna Barrett with Aoife Gallagher and Anita Gallagher who donted hair to the princess trust for the last three years at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonBrenda Curran and Harry Curran from the Curran Dason Gallagher Team with Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising, Irish Cancer Society at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonAnne Marie McGrath and Eunan Walsh with Seamus Murphy, Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising, Irish Cancer Society and Charlie Quinn at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonEileen Tourish from Team Andies Stranorlar with Charlie Quinn, Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society and Eimear Kavanagh at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonTeam Donegal ETB members Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonEileen Tourish from Representing Team Conkers Stranorlar with Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society and Robert O’Connor at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonRelay for Life celebrates amazing €125,000 total for 2019 – Picture Special was last modified: September 10th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Irish Cancer SocietyRelay for Lifelast_img read more

Antibiotic Resistance Moves from Evolution to Design

first_img(Visited 519 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 They can call it evolution, but information sharing is not what Darwin had in mind.“MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered” proclaims an article on Science Daily. At least 14 years before the last-ditch antibiotic was produced to fight this resistant bacterial strain. This implies that selection pressure was not responsible for making methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) “evolve” somehow, because it already existed. But how did this resistance emerge in the first place? The article calls these “pre-existing adaptations in the bacterial population,” but that doesn’t answer the question.To uncover the origins of the very first MRSA and to trace its evolutionary history, the researchers sequenced the genomes of a unique collection of 209 historic S. aureus isolates. The oldest of these isolates were identified over 50 years ago by the S. aureus reference laboratory of Public Health England and have been stored ever since in their original freeze-dried state. The researchers also found genes in these isolates that confer resistance to numerous other antibiotics, as well as genes associated with decreased susceptibility to disinfectants.So the genes for resistance already existed. Bacteria are also known to share information by horizontal gene transfer, which would be a clever design for sharing ways to defeat harmful substances they had not encountered before. The article claims these adaptations evolved, but had no evidence that resistance was already in the microbial population. It might be like house locks. Those without the locks pre-installed could avoid being burglarized, by having obtained the locks in advance.At The Conversation, Predrag Slijepcevic says that bacterial colonies have their own kind of internet. “When resources are exhausted in one place, microbial expedition forces advance to find new lands of plenty,” he says. “They transmit their discoveries back to base using different kinds of chemical signals, calling for microbial society to transform from settlers to colonisers.” This ability to transmit information sounds more like design than Darwinian evolution, which could not wait for lucky beneficial mutations to appear. Instead, it sounds like the cells come with tools to quickly solve problems in new environments, and then communicate those solutions to the colony.For more on antibiotic resistance, see Jonathan Wells’s new book Zombie Science, chapter 8.last_img read more

2011 ‘Be Active’ WA State Championships

first_img38 teams will contest the three day event across six divisions – Men’s Open, Women’s Open, Mixed Open, Men’s 30’s, Senior Women and Men’s 40’s.Included in the line-up is a team from Ramingining, East Arnhem Land, who will travel over 4,000 kilometres to attend the event for the second consecutive year. The team returns with a year of experience under its belt having also competed in the Northern Territory State Championships and the inaugural Arnhem Land Touch Football Festival in 2011, and are sure to again be crowd favourites.  Friday and Saturday will see round games contested, before finals are played on Sunday. The Mixed Open final will be played at 2.40pm, followed by the Women’s Open final, with the Men’s Open final to be played at 4.40pm. In the Men’s Open division, Wanneroo will be looking for back-to-back titles following their two touchdown win over the Southern Stars in 2010, while Southern will be hoping to take out their third title in the past five events at this year’s championships.In the Women’s Open division, Perth Brothers will be hoping to take out consecutive State Championships titles, following their 9-1 win over Northern Districts in 2010. To keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information from the 2011 ‘Be Active’ WA State Championships, please visit the event website:www.statechamps.com.aulast_img read more

NFL Coaches Yell At Refs Because It Freakin Works

In the first quarter of a scoreless 2016 AFC Championship game against the New England Patriots, Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos faced third-and-6 from their own 44-yard line. Wide receiver Demaryius Thomas ran a 15-yard out, breaking toward the Broncos’ sideline. He did not catch Manning’s wobbly throw, but there was contact on the play, and Denver’s players and coaching staff appealed to the official for a pass interference call on Patriots cornerback Logan Ryan. They got one, and the Broncos got a first down, scoring the game’s opening touchdown four plays later.On the ensuing drive, the Patriots faced third-and-3 at their own 27-yard line. Rob Gronkowski ran a wheel route up the Broncos’ sideline with T.J. Ward in coverage. As the Patriots tight end turned to look back for the ball, the defender made contact and shoved him, preventing a catch. Both Gronk and Tom Brady yelled for a penalty. The flag did not come, and the Patriots were forced to punt.Similar plays led to different outcomes that benefited the team on the sideline closest to the on-field action. Most NFL refs would likely say they are immune any sideline bias. “If I make a call because a coach is screaming at me on one side of the field and it’s wrong, that’s a bad day for me,” former NFL official Scott Green told us. (The NFL declined to comment.)But as it turns out, a sideline bias in the NFL is real, and it’s spectacular. To prove it, we looked at the rates at which refs call the NFL’s most severe penalties, including defensive pass interference, aggressive infractions like personal fouls and unnecessary roughness, and offensive holding calls, based on where the offensive team ran its play.1Some of this research was published in March in Economic Inquiry.For three common penalties, the direction of the play — that is, whether it’s run toward the offensive or defensive team’s sideline — makes a significant difference. In other words, refs make more defensive pass interference calls on the offensive team’s sideline but more offensive holding calls on the defensive team’s sideline. What’s more, these differences aren’t uniform across the field — the effect only shows up on plays run, roughly, between the 32-yard lines, the same space where coaches and players are allowed to stand during play.The following graphs show the penalty rates per 1,000 plays for defensive pass interference and aggressive defensive penalties, which include unnecessary roughness, personal fouls, unsportsmanlike conduct, and horse-collar tackles.2The data includes regular-season games between 2010 and 2014, and uses coin-toss information provided by Football Outsiders and play-by-play data from Armchair Analysis. To estimate penalty rates, we used a model of penalty outcomes that depends on yard line and which sideline (offensive or defensive team’s) the play was closer to. Additional methodological details can be found here. Refs throw flags for defensive infractions at significantly higher rates when plays are run in the direction of the offensive team’s sideline; near midfield, defensive penalties are called about 50 percent more often on the offensive team’s sideline than the defensive team’s. Close to the end zone, where the sidelines are supposed to be free of coaches and players, these differences are negligible.For offensive flags, that association is reversed, at least on holding penalties.3Offensive pass interference calls didn’t vary by proximity to either team’s sideline. Here’s the rate of holding calls made on outside run plays, which shows how the defensive team’s sideline can help draw flags on the offense. Around midfield, offensive holding gets called about 35 percent more often on plays run at the defensive team’s sideline. So what could be causing this phenomenon?Refs are faced with a near-impossible task. They make judgment calls in real time, relying on just their eyes and their experience. Deprived of the advantages, like instant replay, that we enjoy from the couch, refs have less information to help them resist the normal subconscious urge to draw on external cues for assistance in making borderline calls. In psychology terms, this process is called cue learning. It’s why we laugh longer in the presence of other humans laughing,4Which, in turn, is the reason that many TV comedies use a laugh track. why we eat more in the presence of overweight company, and why our judgment of persuasive speeches is influenced by the audience’s reaction.The most common cue in sports is crowd noise, and because crowd noise almost always supports the home team, the way the fans sway the referees is the No. 1 driver of home-field advantage in sports. And one notable experiment suggests that how loud a crowd is helps refs decide whether an interaction should be penalized. A pair of German researchers showed actual referees old video clips of possible soccer infractions, with crowd noise played at high or low volume. Refs looking at the exact same interactions were more likely to hand out a yellow card when they heard a lot of crowd noise than when the volume was low.It follows, then, that screaming and hat-throwing football personnel may also have an effect on referee choices. In football, this sideline bias even seems to supersede refs’ tendency to support the home team: The differences in the penalty rates from sideline to sideline are several times larger than the differences in penalty rates between the home and away teams.That bias can affect the outcome even when officials have time to confer. In a 2015 playoff game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Detroit Lions, Matthew Stafford threw a third-and-1 pass to Brandon Pettigrew. Officials initially called defensive pass interference on the Cowboys’ Anthony Hitchens.But the flag occurred right in front of the Cowboys sideline. This led to some confusion. It also led to a helmetless Dez Bryant yelling at the official.After conferring with each other, the officials picked up the flag, a decision that Mike Pereira, Fox Sports’ rules analyst and the NFL’s former vice president of officiating, said was incorrect. Brian Burke of Advanced Football Analytics calculates that when the official picked up the flag, the Lions’ chances of winning that game dropped by 12 percentage points.Dallas won 24-20.Check out our latest NFL playoff predictions. read more

Logan Stieber returning to Ohio State as a coach

OSU’s Logan Stieber (right) wrestles with North Carolina State’s Kevin Jack in a 141-pound semifinal during the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships on March 20 in St. Louis.Credit: Courtesy of TNSOhio State wrestling coach Tom Ryan announced that Logan Stieber will be returning to the Steelwood Training Center after the Olympic Trials in April.Only this time, the most decorated wrestler in OSU history will be setting up residence as a member of the coaching staff.The addition of Stieber will now give a total of six national titles, seven NCAA finals appearances and 11 All-American honors to the coaching staff for the Buckeyes.Stieber earned four national championships, 119 victories and a Hodge Trophy as the nation’s most outstanding wrestler during his career with the Scarlet and Gray. All of those marks were firsts by an OSU wrestler.“I am very excited to be joining the Buckeye staff next year,” Stieber said in a press release. “I love Ohio State, so it’s a dream come true that I can start my coaching career here as well as pursue my Olympic dreams.”After enjoying incredible success while in high school at Monroeville High School, where he won four state titles, Stieber came to OSU and helped the Buckeyes earn their first team title in the team’s 94-year existence in the 2014-15 season.Ryan expressed his excitement for the return of Stieber to OSU and what the return means for the team.“Logan has been a tremendous example here as a student-athlete,” Ryan said in the release. “He completed one of the most illustrious careers in both Ohio high school history and NCAA history by winning four Big Ten and NCAA championships while leading the Buckeyes to our first team title.”Ryan said Stieber’s contributions to the Buckeyes have been more than anyone else in the program’s history, and he expects him to be a great influence to the wrestlers he will coach.“I am excited for the current and future student-athletes that will have the opportunity to learn from Logan,” Ryan said.Ryan also made a note of the importance of volunteer coach Ross Thatcher had on the victory, expressing how much of a powerhouse he believes his coaching staff is.“(Thatcher) had a tremendous influence on bringing our first NCAA team title to Ohio State as well as he mentored our upper weights, especially Nick Heflin and Kyle Snyder,” Ryan said.The Scarlet and Gray wrestling facility will now boast an Olympian (Tervel Dlagnev), a World champion (sophomore Kyle Snyder) and a four-time NCAA champion (Stieber).Those accolades just so happen to make the wrestling room for the Buckeyes the only one with these kind of credentials in the NCAA.After winning a national championship last year and getting off to a 6-2 start this year, it would appear the Buckeyes are looking to build a collegiate dynasty in wrestling with the addition of Stieber, along with the experience of other coaches.After finishing second in the 165-pound class at the U.S. Senior Nationals, Stieber will be attending the U.S. Olympic Team Trials from April 8 to 10 in the hopes of joining the Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Stieber’s younger brother, Hunter, is also a member of the OSU team, but, as he is currently a redshirt senior, he will not be coached by his brother. read more

Womens Hockey No 9 Ohio State drops third straight against Bemidji State

Ohio State junior forward Sara Saekkinen (25) drives the puck down the ice in their game against Minnesota on Jan 26. Credit: Cori Wade | For The LanternIt was the first night of senior weekend for Ohio State, but the evening belonged to Bemidji State and redshirt sophomore goalie Lauren Bench, whose 44 saves allowed a Beavers’ comeback victory in Columbus.Bemidji State women’s hockey (11-16-2, 8-9-2 WCHA) upset No. 9 Ohio State (17-12, 11-10 WCHA) 3-2 on the road Friday night, turning a 2-0 first period deficit into a 3-2 win for its third straight season defeat against the Buckeyes.“They’re similar to us.” Ohio State head coach Nadine Muzerall said. “They grind it out, they play relentless. I don’t know how to break that down philosophically, but they do have our number this year, that’s for sure.”Ohio State dominated the puck for most of the night, putting 46 shots on net, with Bench saving all but two of them.Bench made 22 saves in the third period alone, as Ohio State mounted an urgent offensive front that tried to regain the 2-0 lead they built in the first period on goals from senior forward Madison Field and senior defenseman Lauren Boyle.Junior forward Abby Halluska scored her second goal in as many games against the Buckeyes to put the Beavers on the board and slice the Ohio State lead in half three minutes into the second period.Her breakaway goal off a Buckeye turnover was Halluska’s fifth of the year, and marked a palpable shift in momentum for a Beavers offense that had been outshot 13-5 in the first period and had scored only 54 goals coming into the series.Bemidji State did not let up, as the game-tying strike was provided by Bemidji State sophomore forward Lydia Passolt eight minutes into the second, which took the air out of the Friday night Buckeyes home crowd.Much like their last meeting on Nov. 10, which also saw goals from Halluska and Field, the Beavers and Buckeyes entered the game’s final period knotted at two apiece. Bemidji State completed the comeback with a long-range slap shot that snuck past Ohio State sophomore goalie Lynsey Wallace for her sixth goal of the season, giving the Beavers a 3-2 lead three minutes into the third period.Wallace replaced freshman goalie Andrea Branedli, who Muzerall said is participating in an international tournament with her native Switzerland National Hockey Team. Braendli was named NCAA No. 2 Star of the Week after two straight shutout performances the past weekend at St. Cloud State.Bemidji State was 0-9-1 before getting its first two season wins against the Buckeyes in November, but now claim wins against No. 1 Wisconsin and No. 9 Ohio State in back-to-back weekends.Bench made 27 saves in the Beavers’ upset against Wisconsin this past Friday, which Muzerall said helped build her confidence, as she entered this series with the second-lowest save percentage in the WCHA at .914.Ohio State has lost three straight against Bemidji State, despite outshooting them 119-78, which Ohio State redshirt junior Jincy Dunne said is becoming indicative of the Buckeyes’ shortcomings on offense.“That seems to be a common theme in a lot of our losses we’ve had,” Dunne said. “We’ve just got to find a way to get the puck in the net.”Dunne added that the festivities of Saturday’s senior night may add some fuel on the fire for the Buckeyes.“I think it will be more emotional just because we love our seniors,” Dunne said. “Especially because this could potentially be our last home game. We don’t know yet.”Bemidji State will hope to make it four in a row against the Buckeyes on Saturday night with a season sweep. If it wins, it would be Ohio State’s seventh loss in nine games.The Buckeyes are facing a must-win situation, as they stand at No. 9 and would likely drop from the polls with another loss, which would keep them out of the eight-team NCAA Tournament. read more

Ajax consider Barca as favourites to sign De Ligt

first_imgAjax sporting director Marc Overmars has tipped Barcelona to land in-demand duo Matthijs de Ligt and Frenkie de Jong.De Ligt has been on the radar of Juventus, while De Jong is equally in demand with Barca keen on wrapping up a deal with the parent club.Multiple reports have said the Dutch giants would demand a whopping €140m to part company with their highly-rated star duo.“Barcelona are the favourites, they are a fantastic club,” said Overmars – who used to play at the Camp Nou – as cited by Football Espana.Virgil van Dijk, NetherlandsVan Dijk isn’t better than Messi & Ronaldo, says Van der Vaart Andrew Smyth – September 12, 2019 Rafael van der Vaart reckons Virgil van Dijk is “special”, but he’s still behind Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo as the world’s best players.“But there are two other clubs who are also very close and all of Europe is moving, so Barca must do this well.“Can Messi help? Yes, but money is not the important factor for them – last year they turned down betters offers to stay here.“Will my time at Barca help? They already know about the club without the need for me to say.”last_img read more

Fred Meyer To Stop Selling Guns Ammunition

first_imgThe company had already stopped selling assault-style guns several years ago, except in Alaska. In the statement: “Fred Meyer has made a business decision to exit the firearms category. We are currently working on plans to responsibly phase out sales of firearms and ammunition.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Fred Meyer announced on Friday, March 16, that they will stop selling guns and ammunition at all of their retail stores, including in Alaska. Other stores announced in the wake of that shooting that they would stop selling guns to anyone under 21 including Walmart, and Dick’s Sporting Goods recently banned sales of assault rifles. Following last month’s high school shooting in Parkland, Florida that left 17 people dead, Fred Meyer said it would stop selling firearms to anyone under 21. In a statement the company said it made the decision after evaluating customer preferences. The company sells guns at nearly 45 of its 132 stores in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Alaska. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-fred-meyer-no-longer-selling-guns.mp3VmJennifer-on-fred-meyer-no-longer-selling-guns.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Hunters Heading Into The Woods Advised To Be Careful With Fire

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How The US Government Is Underestimating The Global Growth Of Renewable Energy

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