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SA win World Masters Surfing title

first_img7 April 2008 Team South Africa continued its reign as the undisputed champions of world masters surfing by trumping the world’s best 35-years-and-older surfers to win the overall team crown at the 2008 ISA World Surfing Championships in perfect point break waves at Punta Rocas in Peru at the weekend. Led by individual gold medalists Heather Clark (Masters Women), Marc Wright (Kahunas) and Chris Knutsen (Grand Kahunas), South Africa blew away the competition to take their second consecutive team world championship. They topped the standings with 10 500 points, 1 100 ahead of Australia in second, with Brazil, on 9 041, finishing in third, and hosts Peru rounding out the top four with 8 766 points. Saturday’s final day of competition offered solid one-to-1.5-metre waves for the “Masters Olympics of Surfing”. Former World Championship Tour surfer Heather Clark got the ball rolling for the South African team by blasting her way to victory over Peru’s Rocio Larranaga, Sandra English of Australia and Brigitte Mayer of Brazil in the final of the Masters Women’s (over-35) division. South Africa’s most decorated female surfer was in a league of her own; netting 15.83 points in the final to end the event with the four highest heat tallies and the five highest single ride scores in the women’s event. “I’m absolutely ecstatic,” Clark said. “In 2003 I was in contention for the title on the World Tour, so it’s always been my dream to win a world title. I’m over the moon.” Chris Knutsen was the next winner for South Africa, mixing his trademark rail carves with a radical forehand approach to defeat Peru’s Paco Del Castillo, Australia’s Frank Hayter and Puerto Rico’s Rene Gonzalez in the Grand Kahunas (over-50) division. Knutsen was crowned Kahunas (over-45) world champion in Puerto Rico last year and followed that up with the gold medal in the Grand Kahunas this year. Durban’s Marc Wright completed the South Africa trifecta by snatching a last minute victory over fellow countrymen Nick Pike to nab gold in the Kahunas (over-45) division. Sitting in second place with a minute remaining in the 30-minute final, Wright snared a wave set and produced a series of classy frontside manoeuvres to post a heat-winning 8.33. Pike took the silver with Punta Rocas’ local Jorge Posso getting bronze and Australia’s Rod Baldwin the copper. 1988 Pipeline Masters champion Rob Page of Australia rekindled his competitive surfing career by reaching the finals of both the Grand Masters and Masters divisions. In the Grand Masters, the Wollongong charger out-pointed Peru’s Magoo De La Rosa, Brazil’s Jo Jo Olivenca and South Africa’s Andre Malherbe to capture gold. Puerto Rico’s Juan Ashton was the only Latin America title winner, netting his second successive Masters’ title. He scored a sensational 17.50 out of 20 – the highest score of the day – to defeat Ricardo Toledo of and the Australian pair of Rob Page and Jay Sharpe in the only final that did not feature a South African competitor. ISA President Fernando Aguerre awarded the surfers their medals in the event’s closing ceremony. He was ecstatic about the success of this international event stating. “I would like to thank the Peruvian people and the Peruvian Surfing Federation for welcoming us with open arms,” he said. “The 160 visitors will be leaving the country with a Peruvian warmth tattooed in our hearts; we are new ambassadors for Peru. The proverbial fountain of youth is closer than we might think: It’s the waves of the world…We don’t stop surfing because we get old, we get old because we stop surfing…So don’t stop!” The location of the 2009 ISA World Masters Surfing Championships has not yet been chosen but locations in South Africa and Brazil are in the running. Source: Surfing South Africa  Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Amazon Payments May Integrate NFC (Report)

first_imgAmazon may integrate the emerging technology known as NFC (near field communication) into its mobile applications, allowing customers to pay for items at point-of-sale using only their mobile phone. The technology is currently being explored by the company’s Amazon Payments unit, BusinessWeek recently reported, citing unnamed sources familiar with the project.NFC is a wireless communication technology that allows for data exchanges between short distances and is the backbone of many upcoming mobile wallet initiatives. There are three ways NFC can be implemented on phones: either fully integrated into the handset, such as is the case with new phones like Google’s flagship device, the Nexus S; it can also exist on the SIM card or on a microSD card inserted into a card slot.Note: You can learn more about NFC on ReadWriteMobile, where we’re running a series of articles exploring the technology and its uses. The first of those articles is here. Amazon Thinking About NFCIf the BusinessWeek report is accurate, this news means Amazon is throwing its hat into the ring as yet another company moving into the NFC space. Last week, we reported how Google was ditching barcodes for NFC in its business listings service Places. The company is also reportedly working on its own mobile wallet service in conjunction with Citigroup and MasterCard.Apple, RIM and Isis, a coalition of U.S. operators, are also working on mobile wallet programs, the former two only reportedly, but the latter very publicly via www.paywithisis.com.The benefit of a mobile wallet service, such as the one Amazon may be building, is that it not only replaces plastic credit cards with a mobile phone, but it also allows retailers to immediately transfer rewards in the form of coupons, discounts, loyalty points and more to the handset used during the payment transaction.Using NFC for Price ComparisonsAmazon’s program, the report says, may also introduce a price-comparison feature which allows consumers to tap their phone on an item’s NFC-enabled retail tag in the store in order to locate the item on Amazon.com. This is essentially how Amazon’s mobile application works today, except that it allows users to snap photos and scan barcodes, not use NFC.More news about the project, which is being researched by the Amazon Payments unit, will be revealed in the next three to five months. Tags:#Amazon#mobile#news#NYT#web Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologycenter_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … sarah perezlast_img read more

BCCI faces heat over FEMA violation in IPL

first_imgThe BCCI is under scanner of the Enforcement Directorate (ED) over alleged violation of FEMA during the IPL auctions.  The contentious issue is the base fee agreed upon between the BCCI and 72 foreign players. The forex payment guarantees are in clear violation of FEMA or the Foreign Exchange Management Act. Documents obtained by Headlines Today show that the total base fee guarantee extended by the BCCI was worth 13.4 million dollars or Rs 62 crore. The foreign exchange guarantee was given by the board without permission from the RBI. Foreign exchange transactions made during IPL 2 in South Africa too are under the scanner. These transactions were made with entities like Cricket South Africa and the sponsors. The BCCI had advanced 2.5 million dollars to enable budgeted costs of Cricket South Africa.  Several transactions made to persons residing outside India and the sources of these funds too are being investigated. Juhi Chawla under scannerMeanwhile, Juhi Chawla, a co-owner of the Kolkata Knight Riders, has come under the scanner for alleged FEMA violation.  An ED note accessed by Headlines Today reveals that 40 lakh shares of Chawla were transferred to a Mauritius-based company. The shares were transferred at par in violation of FEMA.  The norms stipulate that since the shares were that of an unlisted company, they should have been valued by a chartered accountant.  The ED report also cites similar irregularities in Kings XI Punjab and Rajasthan Royals.last_img read more