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CRPF commando killed, policeman injured in Jharkhand encounter with Naxalites

first_imgA member of the CRPF’s CoBRA (Commando Battalion for Resolute Action) was killed and a policeman injured in an encounter with Naxalites in Saraikela area of Jharkhand on Thursday, officials said.A gunfight began early morning in the Dalbhaga-Arki area of the Saraikela-Kharsawan district at 7 a.m. when a joint team of the 209th battalion of the CoBRA and the Jharkhand police was out for operation.The encounter took place in Saraikela, the administrative headquarters of Saraikela Kharsawan district, which is about 135-km from the State capitalHeavy firing wasl on.last_img read more

Patna’s more-than-a-century-old heritage market demolished for Smart City project

first_imgThe over 100-year-old Gole Market, a unique heritage building constructed as Patna’s first planned municipal market, has been demolished by local authorities as part of a Smart City project. The demolition work began on Friday and by Sunday the historic landmark, located in the heart of Bihar’s capital and endowed with beautiful red-tiled roof, was reduced to a skeletal shell.“The Gole Market was demolished as part of a major redevelopment project of the railway station area under the Smart City initiative. Other markets lining the streets are also being knocked down as part of the mega project,” Patna Municipal Commissioner Anupam Kumar Suman told PTI. As part of this Smart City project, the now-dismantled Gole Market, located near Patna Junction, will make way for a seven-storeyed commercial complex and a modern municipal market along with a vending zone will come up in the area adjoining the Station Road, he said. Popularly known as Gole Market, among the local people, it was Patna’s first planned municipal market designed by architect Joseph Fearis Munnings while he was planning the layout of the ‘New Capital’ city of colonial Patna after the creation of the new province of Bihar and Orissa in 1912. Despite the historical value of the building, the demolition drew feeble protest from citizens of the city, but many people in Patna are angered by the move. “This is just madness. It was a historical building and should have been preserved. But, instead of restoring and reusing it as a cafe or something, the corporation razed it,” said city-based researcher and author Arun Singh.“One by one the local government is knocking down heritage buildings in the city. This is an attempt to erase the colonial history of Patna in the name of development,” he alleged. In December last year, the 133-year-old Anjuman Islamia Hall, perhaps the first public hall of Patna, was demolished to make way for a modern complex. The heritage market had faced decades of neglect and its occupant shopkeepers had been feeling the shadow of the wrecking ball for years as local authorities had planned a redevelopment project much earlier, a local shopkeeper, who did not wish to be named, said. “My grandfather had a meat shop in it during the British time, and elite of the city would come in their cars to buy meat, fish, chicken, eggs, grocery and milk. It should have been preserved,” he said. City-based 84-year-old architect and INTACH Patna Chapter Convener J.K. Lall also expressed shock and anger over the demolition of Gole Market.“It was a unique single-storeyed building with a raised central hexagonal core topped with elegant red-tiled roof and two flanks came out of it and again it was topped with red tiles of the colonial-era Burn & Co. It was a perfect building and a perfect setting for a heritage cafe,” he told PTI.“Smart City also means preserving our architectural legacy and not just building new ones,” he said. PMC Commissioner Suman, when asked why the building was demolished, said, the Gole Market was “coming in the middle” of the layout of the Smart City project plan.“There were suggestions made to us by a few heritage lovers to preserve the building and reuse it as a cafe. We tried but the market structure was coming in the way of the plan. So, we had no option left but to knock it down,” he said.“Also, besides the fact that it was designed 100 years ago by Munnings as the first municipal market, there was not much heritage value to it. And, sometimes we have to lose something old to build a new, better future,” the municipal commissioner said. However, the iron shell of the building and whatever can be salvaged will be stored and later reused in a new gazebo at the site, Suman said. “That gazebo will be built with new material and old material from the dismantled Gole Market. We are trying to look into our archives to know about the history of the building, which along with old pictures would be displayed there, so that people will know there was a Gole Market here,” he said. Retired bureaucrat R.N. Dash, who served as the district magistrate of Patna from 1972-74 and Divisional Commissioner from 1983-85, said the demolition was a “wrong move” and that restoration and proper rehabilitation of local shopkeepers should have been planned instead. “The overall master plan should have ensured the preservation of the market and other heritage buildings, and Smart City project should have factored that in. Converting it into a cafe was a good idea and people coming to these complexes would have visited too, so it was a win-win situation,” he said. Ironically, Gole Market was also listed as a heritage building in a 2008 Bihar goverment publication — Patna: A Monumental History. Mr. Singh, whose book Patna – Khoya Hua Shahar came out early this year, talks about the history and glory days of this market, located in what is termed officially as the New Market area, falling between the railway station rotary and the Patna GPO roundabout. “In its heydays, it had a rose garden around it and six routes leading to it from the streets around it.“British people including European women would visit there as would the Indians in their cars. Instead of restoring old charm, as done world over, Patna is wilfully destroying its own heritage,” he rued.last_img read more

IPL 4 auction: Will Ganguly, Lara find takers today

first_imgFile photo of fomer Indian captain Sourav Ganguly.This year’s auction saw money splurging on players for record deals but there were some big names who, surprisingly, found no takers from among the 10 franchisees.Having doubled his base price to $4,00,000 (Rs 1.84 cr), former Indian captain Sourav Ganguly was in for a rude shock when he failed to find any bidders at the auction from amongst the 10 IPL teams.Ganguly wasn’t the only big name who was given a cold shoulder by the franchises as even former West Indies skippers Chris Gayle and Brian Lara were snubbed.While Lara hasn’t played much of cricket in the last four years and does not have much experience in the shortest format of the game, Gayle’s fate was unexpected.The big Jamaican is a proven T20 cricketer with his attacking strokeplay and useful off-spinners and was one of the most talked about signing in the first IPL auction where Kolkata Knight Riders inked a deal with him. Besides, there are other names like England’s Graeme Swann and South African Herschelle Gibbs who weren’t picked.While Ganguly and Lara failed to prove their prowess for the highly demanding IPL seasons, doubts over the availability of Gayle and Swann, arguably the best off-spinner in the world at the moment, for the event could have cost them a place in the Twenty20 extravaganza.But with no takers on Day One of the auction, it is still not the end of the road for the unsold players as they will be up for sale on Sunday after the first round of auction. But it is highly unlikely that any of these names will fetch anything more than their base price. It was surprising that Ganguly decided to double his base price from $2,00,000 even though it was clear that he was not likely to get too many bidders.advertisementBut there could be some thought in that move. At Rs 1.84 crore, franchisees may have found Ganguly an expensive signing and preferred to put in their money on younger players.But on Sunday, Ganguly could well be seen in the camp of Pune Warriors for the base price.Those who remain unsold: Tamim Iqbal, Chamara Kapugedera, Murali Kartik, Ajantha Mendis, Graeme Swann, James Anderson, Dilhara Fernando, Luke Wright, Matt Prior, Mark Boucher, Graeme Manou, Brian Lara, Herschelle Gibbs, Jesse Ryder, Sourav Ganguly and Chris Gayle.FAQ’sWhat are marquee players? Those players, who went under the hammer first and are picked according to a combination of their valuation and star power. These players will be retained by their franchisees for 3 editions. For this year’s auction, there are 27 marquee players.How many teams will be participating in IPL-4? Ten. This includes the eight existing teams and two news teams – Team Kochi and Pune Warriors.What is the total purse for each franchisee? $ 9 million. But the teams that have retained some players will have their budgets reduced as the price of such players.What is player retention? Each of the eight franchisees, who were part of the last three editions, were allowed to retain four players.What’s the condition regarding overseas players? A team is allowed to play only four overseas players in a match. Besides, four players must belong to the catchment area where the team is located.What is the maximum pool of players a franchise can have? Each franchise can have a maximum squad of 30 players. They must have 4 under-21 players in the pool.Who is the master auctioneer? Richard Madley, a professional auctioneer from England, is accepting the bids from all the franchisees as he did for the last 3 editions.last_img read more

Hasina calls civil society dustbin of politics

first_img.Prime minister Sheikh Hasina once again on Wednesday blasted the civil society, describing it as the ‘dustbin of politics and power’.”There’re people who’re always ready to sell themselves to evil forces, be it dustbin beside roads that reads ‘use me’. They’re also like that [trash bin] that hang up on their chests ‘use me’ for politics and power,” she said.The prime minister said this while responding to a supplementary question from ruling party MP Fazilatun Nesa Bappy in parliament during her question-answer session.She said this section of people are always found ready when there will be a state of emergency in the country or when someone will come to grab the state power through martial law.”If it happens so, they’ll get attention, they’ll get the flag [national flag to fly in car] and they’ll be in power,” Sheikh Hasina said.The premier said if anyone believes in democracy then one should go to people and participate in the election.”They’ve to come to power through election. There’s a section of people who never want to go to people. They always look for other means to be there in power.”She raised question about the meaning and explanation of ‘civil society’. “Based on which theory they are civil! This question comes up when they don’t see anything even after seeing, don’t hear anything even after hearing and don’t want to understand anything. I don’t know whether they’re civil or uncivil,” she said.Sheikh Hasina said Bangladesh is marching ahead with accelerated development activities and the whole world is recognising this. “But this is very much unfortunate that some people don’t see this development. They’re blind despite having eyes; they’re deaf despite having ears.”She also said no one can make them understand this development of the country. “This is one kind of sickness because their eyes are on illegal ways to grab power,” the she told parliament.Recently, Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD) said the banking sector of Bangladesh has become a “growing malignancy” for the economy due to rising bad loans and lack of governance.It also mentioned that the gap between the rich and poor has widened despite the continued economic growth in the country.last_img read more