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Relay for Life celebrates amazing €125,000 total for 2019 – Picture Special

first_imgThe Relay for Life committee has announced that an incredible €125,196.54 was raised for the Irish Cancer Society at this year’s event.The charity group presented a cheque to Mark Mellett of The Irish Cancer Society at a team celebration evening in the Mount Errigal Hotel on Monday.Relay for Life Donegal’s successful summer event brought the community together again to fundraise for vital research and services of the Irish Cancer Society. Money raised is spent locally, including support and care for cancer patients and their families and a clinical research programme at Letterkenny University Hospital. The Relay for Life team has thanked every person who was involved in the 2019 event and made it a success, including team members, entertainers, volunteers and many more individuals and businesses.The 2020 Relay for Life Donegal date has now been set for Saturday 23rd and Sunday 24th of May 2020 and planning is already underway for next year.See all the photos by Clive Wasson from the cheque presentation here:Optum’s Super Heroes Amanda McFadden and Anne Marie Gallagher with Seamus Murphy, Drew Corry and Robert O’Connor at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonKelly’s Centra, Letterkenny presenting their cheque at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonRelay for Life Committee members with the €125,196.54 raised at this year’s Relay For Life at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel from left are Seamus Devine, Eimear Kavanagh, Seamus Quinn, Ena Barrett, Seamus McBride, Seamus Murphy, Donal Kavanagh and Drew Corry.Photo Clive WassonRobert O’Connor speaking at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonMembers of the Kernans Team who raised €10,000 at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonPrancers Agains Cancer present their cheque at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonCathy’s Team Members with Robert O’Connor and Charlie Quinn at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonThis years figure of €125,196.54 is revealed at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonMark Mellett, Head of Fundraising receives the cheque for €125,196.54 from Drew Corry, Relay for Life Donegal Treasurer at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonMark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society receives the cheque for €125,196.54 from Drew Corry, Relay for Life Donegal Treasurer with Teams at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonEntertainers from the Relay For Life at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Front from left are Andrew McBrearty, Denis Curran, Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society Paddy Bradley and Oisin Bradley. Back from left are Paul McCahal, Caolin, Aidan Murphy, Conor McLaughlin, Hilary Anne Heatherington, Amy Meehan and Charlie Collins. Photo Clive WassonUlster Tyres group at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonEna Barrett with Aoife Gallagher and Anita Gallagher who donted hair to the princess trust for the last three years at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonBrenda Curran and Harry Curran from the Curran Dason Gallagher Team with Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising, Irish Cancer Society at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonAnne Marie McGrath and Eunan Walsh with Seamus Murphy, Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising, Irish Cancer Society and Charlie Quinn at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonEileen Tourish from Team Andies Stranorlar with Charlie Quinn, Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society and Eimear Kavanagh at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonTeam Donegal ETB members Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel. Photo Clive WassonEileen Tourish from Representing Team Conkers Stranorlar with Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising Irish Cancer Society and Robert O’Connor at the presentation of the Relay For Life cheque on Monday night last in the Mount Errigal Hotel.Photo Clive WassonRelay for Life celebrates amazing €125,000 total for 2019 – Picture Special was last modified: September 10th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Irish Cancer SocietyRelay for Lifelast_img read more

Warriors’ Steve Kerr on DeMarcus Cousins’ return: “It’s still going to be some time”

first_img* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *OAKLAND — The Warriors said they have heard nothing but good news regarding DeMarcus Cousins’ ongoing rehab with his left Achilles tendon. That does not mean that Cousins will return soon, though.“We’re not right there. It’s still going to be some time,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “We’re going to be patient and continue to give DeMarcus the space he needs to …last_img read more

Imaginary Feathers Found on American Dinosaur

first_imgLive Science admits this creature comes from “an enigmatic group of dinosaurs” that are “not really well-known” other than the certainty about their imaginary feathers (see 6/13/07, 7/09/08, 9/20/11, 5/03/13).The original paper in PLoS ONE, like the popular media, calls it a “presumably feathered dinosaur” but otherwise includes no evidence of feathers. “Most if not all oviraptorosaurs were feathered,” the paper says, citing “direct preservation”, “possible quill knobs” (9/09/10) and “pygostyle-like terminal caudal vertebrae” (pygostyle means the bone at the end of the tail, made of fused vertebrae—not feathers).  After “direct preservation” the quote cites 3 papers that mention the Chinese fossils Protarcheopteryx, Caudipteryx, and Similicaudipteryx, discussed elsewhere (use search bar) as possibly secondarily flightless birds.Just today, though, Nature published an analysis of melanosomes from scales and feathers from creatures as diverse as mammals, birds, dinosaurs, pterosaurs, lizards and turtles.  The researchers, mostly from China, noted a distinct break between the melanosomes of reptiles and those of birds.   Considering that “When this relationship evolved relative to the origin of feathers and other novel integumentary structures, such as hair and filamentous body covering in extinct archosaurs, has not been evaluated,” they were rather surprised at what they found:We find that in the lineage leading to birds, the observed increase in the diversity of melanosome morphologies appears abruptly, near the origin of pinnate feathers in maniraptoran dinosaurs. Similarly, mammals show an increased diversity of melanosome form compared to all ectothermic amniotes. In these two clades, mammals and maniraptoran dinosaurs including birds, melanosome form and colour are linked and colour reconstruction may be possible. By contrast, melanosomes in lizard, turtle and crocodilian skin, as well as the archosaurian filamentous body coverings (dinosaur ‘protofeathers’ and pterosaur ‘pycnofibres’), show a limited diversity of form that is uncorrelated with colour in extant taxa.Another article on PhysOrg, though, questions whether colors can be deduced from melanosomes.  Researchers at North Carolina State believe “it is not yet possible to tell if these structures – thought to be melanosomes – are what they seem, or if they are merely the remnants of ancient bacteria.”In order to keep the story of feather evolution going, Nature offered the following speculation:These patterns may be explained by convergent changes in the key melanocortin system of mammals and birds, which is known to affect pleiotropically both melanin-based colouration and energetic processes such as metabolic rate in vertebrates, and may therefore support a significant physiological shift in maniraptoran dinosaurs.Other than that, there was no further mention of evolution.  True pinnate feathers (as on birds), it should be noted, are not mere “novel integumentary structures,” but distinct systems involving follicles, stem cells, and regulatory proteins.  It must have taken a “significant physiological shift” to evolve them, indeed.Imagining is like lying.  Once you get started, it’s hard to stop, and each subsequent instance has to get more emphatic to keep the tale going. (Visited 64 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Once again, imaginary feathers have been discovered on a “bird-like” dinosaur, this time from the Dakotas.The fossil was discovered about a decade ago, but is only now being described.  Artwork shows feathered arms and fuzz on the body and legs of the ten-foot “chicken from hell,” Anzu wylieli.  Science reporters describe the imaginary feathers in detail:It boasted a flashy head crest and probably wore feathers. (Live Science)It was a giant raptor, but with a chicken-like head and presumably feathers. (PhysOrg)The size of a small car, the dinosaur also had claws and feathers on its upper arms. (BBC News)Although the Anzu specimens preserve only bones, close relatives of this dinosaur have been found with fossilized feathers, strongly suggesting that the new creature was feathered too. (Science Daily)The 66-million-year-old feathered dino resembled a demonic cassowary. (National Geographic)In addition to its long limbs, the team found the ancient animal sported a stubby tail, likely framed by a fan of tail feathers. Though the team didn’t find direct evidence of feathers, the species was so closely related to birds that it was very likely covered in feathers that looked identical to those of modern birds. No one knows why the dino needed feathers-courtship displays and insulation are two theories—but the scientists do know its environment was hot. (National Geographic)The first, Anzu, translates to mean “Mesopotamian feathered demon.”  The new fossils were not found with feathers, Schachner said, but the dinosaur’s close relatives had them, and it’s highly likely Anzu wylieli did, too.  (Live Science)With its head crest and presumably feathered forelegs, the newly discovered and described dinosaur Anzu wyliei was nicknamed the “chicken from hell” by its discoverers at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History…. (PhysOrg)last_img read more

The right time for fertilizer application pays (because the wrong time is so costly)

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest When it comes to understanding the right time to apply nutrients, it is important to know when it is the wrong time.Several years ago it had been a wet and frustrating fall for getting any field work done in the Lost Creek Watershed in northwest Ohio. It was followed by a fairly cold winter and there was an extended period of frozen conditions in February that provided a great opportunity to catch up for lost time.“We got a nice window and pretty much every dealer in the area was working on spreading fertilizer on frozen ground. There was about four inches of snow cover. Less than a week later we received a three-plus-inch rain event that melted the snow and allowed for major surface runoff on the frozen ground. There was rain/snow in the forecast, but no one was forecasting a three-inch rain. So the farmers and dealers that were spreading weren’t really in the wrong. However, those conditions create a high risk for nutrients to leave the field and in this case that happened. It warmed up and we got a big rain and the toilet flushed,” said Clint Nester, with Nester Ag, LLC in Williams County. “It was the one of the biggest phosphorus levels Heidelberg University has ever recorded in the water monitoring of the watershed. Those applications were made at the wrong time — everything else was right — and we lost nutrients big time.”In many ways, the right time is the easiest of the 4Rs to understand, but one of the hardest to actually do. Hindsight can make the wrong times to apply fertilizer seem very obvious, but the process of determining the right time can be quickly convoluted by weather uncertainties, changing soil conditions, farm work logistics, and just plain old bad luck.“If you are a really good weatherman you can avoid a lot of those spikes you see with phosphorus loss from fields, but we know how well that works. That big rain event in the Lost Creek Watershed really opened some eyes in the area, including for our business,” Nester said. “Until that time we still had customers that took that opportunity to spread on frozen ground because it worked well for the logistics of getting things done. After that, guys backed off of doing that. Farmers don’t want their money floating down the river. And when that happens you never know what you really lost and don’t know how much to re-apply. In many cases, you have to assume you lost it all and you end up re-applying the whole rate. That gets expensive.”Senate Bill 1 sets some fairly clear, common sense guidelines for applying nutrients at the right time in the Western Lake Erie Basin watershed. Specifically, for applications of granular fertilizer (defined as nitrogen or phosphorous) in the Western Lake Erie Basin, a person may not apply:1. On snow-covered or frozen soil;2. When the top two inches of soil are saturated from precipitation;3. When the local weather forecast prediction for the application area contains greater than a 50% chance of precipitation exceeding: one inch in a 12-hour period for granular fertilizer or one-half inch in a 24-hour period for manure.These requirements can be exempted if the fertilizer/nutrient is injected into the ground, incorporated within 24 hours of surface application or applied to a growing crop. This is the law for all or part of 24 counties in northwest Ohio.For businesses certified through Ohio’s 4R Nutrient Stewardship Certification Program, these SB 1 rules are a good common-sense start to avoiding costly nutrient loss by applying at the right time, said Chris Horning, the North Data Operational Lead for Sunrise Cooperative. Sunrise was among the first 4R Certified businesses.Chris Horning“We have a yearly applicator training that covers the 4Rs and usually the auditors will be out talking to the nutrient applicators when they are doing the audit. They incorporate a lot of the 4Rs into the two-day training session,” Horning said. “The applicators know that if they are in the field, 95% of the time the weather forecast is not going to tell you about a three- or four-inch gully washer. If they are sitting there and the sky is black, they know they need to check back with the office and make sure they are still on track with the operation manager and the grower as far as the timing goes. If there are any questions on field conditions or the way the weather looks, they need to check back in. We do a lot of things ahead of time to try and not get in that position sitting in the fields in the spring waiting to putting fertilizer on, but rainfall is one of the biggest issues that creates challenges. Most guys don’t want you out there in saturated soils anyway and the frozen ground we know to avoid.”Sunrise has seen a big shift to spring application away from putting on nutrients in the fall. The cooperative also works on more applications of smaller amounts of nutrients.“We are geared up with equipment to split those applications up with in-crop dry applications and we are working with farmers with Y-Drops, using different nitrogen models to determine the right rate for the growing season. And for the fall applications, we are putting down just a one-year supply of nutrients and not two or three,” Horning said. “We have been working closely with the 4R guidelines and if we are spreading in the fall, it is incorporated within 24 hours and that takes a lot of pressure off.”Horning said another very useful tool for nutrient applicators is the Ohio Nutrient Management Record Keeper (ONMRK) app. The app was developed with input from Ohio State University Extension in Knox County, Ohio Farm Bureau, and Knox County Soil and Water Conservation District to meet the new state recordkeeping requirements for both SB 1 and Senate Bill 150. ONMRK helps farmers comply with state laws by recording their fertilizer or manure application as well as the current weather conditions and forecast for the next 24 hours.“That is really handy. It gives you the 12-hour and 24-hour forecast for the spot you are sitting and really helps you meet the guidelines. It also helps with documenting it as well. You can get that app for free on your phone. It will even tell you if an application is recommended or not,” Horning said. “It really helps us to be compliant.”The requirements of SB1 create a base to further refine nutrient application recommendations from Nester Ag that has also been certified through 4R Nutrient Stewardship Certification Program.“Guys are paying big dollars to put those nutrients out on the land and when we make recommendations we don’t put a fudge factor on there for what is going to the ditch. We want the nutrients they apply to the field to stay in the field. Those laws are in place but it also makes sense with economics to keep those nutrients in the field,” Nester said. “Those laws are only for nitrogen and phosphorus, so if you wanted to spread potash when a rain is coming there is no law to say you can’t do that, but we tell guys it is a high risk time to apply those and that they need to avoid any potential for the nutrients to leave the field. That just makes sense economically and environmentally.”Beyond those basics outlined in SB 1, there are still many right (and wrong) times to apply nutrients to fields. There are clear advantages to minimizing nutrient loss by applying the right rates of nutrients as close to the time when the plants need them as possible during the growing season.“If a guy can apply in the spring I would say that probably reduces the risk of losing those nutrients because you don’t have them out there during the winter months when you can get those two- or three-inch rains on frozen ground and soil is moving,” Nester said. “But, on the acres that some guys cover, they just can’t do it all in the spring. In some cases, they will do some of their acres in the fall and leave their leakier fields — the fields that are more prone to leaching — to get to in the spring. With nitrogen we still tell our guys to break that total nitrogen up if possible so maybe they’ll be putting a little on with their broadcast fertilizer, maybe some ammonium sulfate. Then they could come in with some starter on the planter and then come back with some weed and feed either before or after the planter, based on their program. Then we can come back with sidedress and some guys are now coming back with the Y-Drops for a fifth trip.”But even with the extensive effort to put nitrogen on at the right time for the plant, loss is still possible.“Nitrogen loss is very weather dependent. This year there was not much loss in this area. In 2015, though, we saw an example of too much rain and definite nitrogen loss in the corn crop,” Nester said. “We have seen instances when you get early spring rains and if you have put everything out up front, you get problems. Having it split up reduces the risk of losing huge amounts of nitrogen. If you lose 10% of 10% it is a big difference compared to losing 10% of your total nitrogen.”The right time for phosphorous applications involves considering an entirely different set of factors. There are plenty of wrong times to apply phosphorous, but there are some things that can be done to expand the windows of “right time” opportunities.“Phosphorus is a whole different animal and it is hard to pinpoint because we have such a large pool of phosphorus available in the soil that is not available to the plant. It is always cycling. We have tried to put out phosphorus plots to learn more. You can not spread phosphorus one year and you won’t see a yield decrease unless you have critically low P levels. We can’t show much data about timing of phosphorus applications making a difference one way or another,” Nester said. “We do know if we can avoid putting it on the surface in the fall it reduces the chance to lose that dissolved reactive phosphorus over the surface or though the tile.  Incorporating it can be a viable solution to try and keep it in the field.“No-till situations can lead to bigger pores and more pathways for it to get to the tile. Strip-tilling phosphorus in the fall can work too as a pretty safe way to apply. You put it right in the soil at the root zone where the crop will need it. We work with guys who strip-till and we have been able to reduce rates by about 20% and we checked it with strips in the field and we are not taking any yield hit with that 20% reduction. Strip-tilling it in in the fall is very efficient. You are getting it incorporated in the soil and we can apply less fertilizer and keep yields up. It saves money and doesn’t allow for much runoff to the streams.”Cover crops are also a great tool for making more opportunities to apply at the right time.“We preach cover crops to our customers for a multitude of reasons. Hopefully they get a yield gain, they reduce erosion and they help keep nutrients in the field,” he said. “The ideal situation in the fall is to apply to a cover crop — something that is going to overwinter. Some guys plant radishes or oats and as soon as we get the first freeze they are done. There was some research that showed radishes alone as a cover crop were bringing nutrients to the surface and really concentrating them there to the point that it was more of a detriment to planting radishes only than getting a benefit. If you are going to run one cover crop it should be something that will stay green all winter. And, if you are going to apply when conditions are a little iffy, a cover crop definitely reduces that risk factor.”Ultimately, the right rate of the right product at the right place does little good if applied at the wrong time.“You can do three things right with the 4Rs and still be wrong,” Nester said. “You have to do them all and follow those four key principles. You can’t just do one.”For more, visit 4rcertified.org.last_img read more

IPL 4 auction: Will Ganguly, Lara find takers today

first_imgFile photo of fomer Indian captain Sourav Ganguly.This year’s auction saw money splurging on players for record deals but there were some big names who, surprisingly, found no takers from among the 10 franchisees.Having doubled his base price to $4,00,000 (Rs 1.84 cr), former Indian captain Sourav Ganguly was in for a rude shock when he failed to find any bidders at the auction from amongst the 10 IPL teams.Ganguly wasn’t the only big name who was given a cold shoulder by the franchises as even former West Indies skippers Chris Gayle and Brian Lara were snubbed.While Lara hasn’t played much of cricket in the last four years and does not have much experience in the shortest format of the game, Gayle’s fate was unexpected.The big Jamaican is a proven T20 cricketer with his attacking strokeplay and useful off-spinners and was one of the most talked about signing in the first IPL auction where Kolkata Knight Riders inked a deal with him. Besides, there are other names like England’s Graeme Swann and South African Herschelle Gibbs who weren’t picked.While Ganguly and Lara failed to prove their prowess for the highly demanding IPL seasons, doubts over the availability of Gayle and Swann, arguably the best off-spinner in the world at the moment, for the event could have cost them a place in the Twenty20 extravaganza.But with no takers on Day One of the auction, it is still not the end of the road for the unsold players as they will be up for sale on Sunday after the first round of auction. But it is highly unlikely that any of these names will fetch anything more than their base price. It was surprising that Ganguly decided to double his base price from $2,00,000 even though it was clear that he was not likely to get too many bidders.advertisementBut there could be some thought in that move. At Rs 1.84 crore, franchisees may have found Ganguly an expensive signing and preferred to put in their money on younger players.But on Sunday, Ganguly could well be seen in the camp of Pune Warriors for the base price.Those who remain unsold: Tamim Iqbal, Chamara Kapugedera, Murali Kartik, Ajantha Mendis, Graeme Swann, James Anderson, Dilhara Fernando, Luke Wright, Matt Prior, Mark Boucher, Graeme Manou, Brian Lara, Herschelle Gibbs, Jesse Ryder, Sourav Ganguly and Chris Gayle.FAQ’sWhat are marquee players? Those players, who went under the hammer first and are picked according to a combination of their valuation and star power. These players will be retained by their franchisees for 3 editions. For this year’s auction, there are 27 marquee players.How many teams will be participating in IPL-4? Ten. This includes the eight existing teams and two news teams – Team Kochi and Pune Warriors.What is the total purse for each franchisee? $ 9 million. But the teams that have retained some players will have their budgets reduced as the price of such players.What is player retention? Each of the eight franchisees, who were part of the last three editions, were allowed to retain four players.What’s the condition regarding overseas players? A team is allowed to play only four overseas players in a match. Besides, four players must belong to the catchment area where the team is located.What is the maximum pool of players a franchise can have? Each franchise can have a maximum squad of 30 players. They must have 4 under-21 players in the pool.Who is the master auctioneer? Richard Madley, a professional auctioneer from England, is accepting the bids from all the franchisees as he did for the last 3 editions.last_img read more

Retired boxer Mike Tyson reveals his starry ambitions