Tag: 上海夜网

Laimbeer excited for chance to build Las Vegas franchise

first_img“I’m looking at a huge task in front of me,” Laimbeer said. “First I have to build a staff from everything from video coordinator and interns to my assistants to basketball ops people. I’ve been making lists and lists and lists.”His task is a little easier than other startup franchises because MGM has been in the entertainment business for years.“I think it’s new to them. They understand arenas, they understand all that goes into the logistics and selling tickets,” Laimbeer said. “The basketball part they are into, but it’s not something they’ve really done before. I have the experience that I can navigate and explain what this is and how it works and what the opportunities are. I know all the infrastructure and the how-to. My job is to set everything up.”Finding those people won’t be so hard, as Laimbeer said his phone has been ringing nonstop since it was announced that he took the job.MGM will not be the first company with casino holdings to own a WNBA team. The Mohegan Sun owns the team in Connecticut. The blueprint for Nevada is somewhat similar.ADVERTISEMENT Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Kiefer Ravena ‘very excited’ to play for Guiao at NLEX Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set The 60-year-old Laimbeer could stay with New York as the team’s general manager or find employment elsewhere.His decision was made a bit easier when his phone rang a few weeks ago. An executive at MGM Resorts International asked him to be the coach and president of the new WNBA team that was moving from San Antonio to Las Vegas.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“I said I’d talk to my wife,” Laimbeer said. “At the end of the day, I like challenge and I think this would be a great experience.”Laimbeer accepted the new position, which he will start Nov. 1. In this Aug. 29, 2015, file photo, New York Liberty coach Bill Laimbeer watches during the team’s WNBA basketball game against the Connecticut Sun in Uncasville, Conn. AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)NEW YORK — Bill Laimbeer found himself at a crossroad.His contract with the New York Liberty was up and he wasn’t sure if he wanted to stay or move on. He had spent the last few years grooming Katie Smith to be the team’s next head coach and felt the time was right for her to take over the team, which lost in the second round of the playoffs for the second consecutive year.ADVERTISEMENT Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? “While other teams are restocking their cupboards, we have to order things from scratch like basketballs, athletic tape, nearly everything,” Laimbeer said.This will be the first professional basketball team in Las Vegas, which has become a coveted target for sports franchises over the past few years.The expansion Vegas Golden Knights began their first NHL season this month. In March, the NFL formally approved the Oakland Raiders’ relocation to Las Vegas by the 2020 season to occupy a proposed new stadium on the Las Vegas Strip, although the deal wasn’t approved until casino mogul Sheldon Adelson pulled out of the financing plan.The Golden Knights play at MGM’s T-Mobile Arena, but the casino doesn’t own the team.“This is the first pro sports team that MGM resorts owns and it’s a great alignment frankly with the DNA of our company,” said Lilian Tomovich, MGM’s chief experience and marketing officer.Laimbeer inherits a team that finished last for the second straight year. San Antonio has a talented young nucleus with Kayla McBride, Moriah Jefferson and Kelsey Plum. The team also has the top chance to get the No. 1 pick in next year’s draft.“They need a change of culture,” Laimbeer said. “Any time you get a team that’s beat down record-wise, you have to have a catalyst for a change. This is a tremendous catalyst. Going to an exciting venue and situation where there’s resources. I have been successful creating a team that can compete. We can break out of this thing.”Laimbeer also thinks being in Las Vegas will be attractive to free agents.“Players will want to come here,” he said. “All the signs point to a great opportunity. We have to pick up the pieces and make it happen.”This is the second move for the franchise. It came to San Antonio from Utah in 2003. Led by Becky Hammon, the Stars reached the WNBA Finals in 2008. The team has finished with the league’s worst record each of the past three seasons. LATEST STORIES Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ setcenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ MOST READlast_img read more

Navarro catches fire late as San Sebastian forces three-way tie for 4th

first_imgLOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Blazers have now lost six of their last seven games to drop to 3-10.The Scores:SAN SEBASTIAN 73 – Navarro 16, Calisaan 11, Costelo 10, Bulanadi 8, Valdez 8, Baetiong 7, David 5, Ilagan 3, Calma 2, Mercado 2, Gayosa 1, Baytan 0, Capobres 0, Quipse 0.ST. BENILDE 61 – Leutcheu 15, Naboa 15, Castor 7, Belgica 5, Domingo 5, San Juan 4, Young 4, Johnson 3, Mercado 2, Dixon 1, Pili 0, Sta. Maria 0.Quarters: 13-10, 30-20, 51-42, 73-61.ADVERTISEMENT E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City View comments Lyceum refuses to be content with Final Four spot MOST READ Michael Calisaan chipped in a double-double with 11 markers and 11 rebounds, while Ryan Costelo got 10 for San Sebastian, as it kept itself in the Final Four race with its 6-6 record and forcing a three-way logjam at fourth place with Letran and EAC.“I guess the boys really want to be here. Hopefully, everybody will step up so that we won’t have a difficult time getting to the Final Four,” said coach Egay Macaraya.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Golden Stags had a hard time pulling away against the Blazers before Navarro drilled back-to-back triples in the payoff period to grab a 70-52 lead with 3:34 remaining.Clement Leutcheu paced St. Benilde with 15 points and nine rebounds against eight turnovers, while Unique Naboa also had 15 markers and three boards. Renzo Navarro. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netRenzo Navarro waxed hot in the fourth quarter as he led San Sebastian to a 73-61 win over St. Benilde Thursday in the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament at the Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.The diminutive playmaker went 5-of-6 from beyond the arc to finish with 16 points, 12 of which coming in the payoff period to help the Golden Stags hold off the Blazers.ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City PLAY LIST 01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Gameslast_img read more

Iowa Releases 6-Minute Tribute Video To Roy Marble, Who Passed Away Friday

first_imgA game ball for the NCAA Tournament.LOUISVILLE, KY – MARCH 15: A detail of an official NCAA Men’s Basketball game ball made by Wilson is seen on the court as the Iowa State Cyclones play against the Connecticut Huskies during the second round of the 2012 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament at KFC YUM! Center on March 15, 2012 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)It’s been a tough week for Iowa fans. This past Tuesday, former football star Tyler Sash passed away at the age of just 27 years old. Friday, former basketball player Roy Marble, the leading scorer in Hawkeyes history, died after a year-long battle with cancer. He was only 48 years old.Friday afternoon, Iowa released a touching six-minute tribute video in Marble’s memory. You can view it below.A Tribute Video to Roy Marble http://t.co/EyoS82ilVl— The Iowa Hawkeyes (@TheIowaHawkeyes) September 11, 2015Our thoughts and prayers are with Marble’s friends and family during what’s surely been a tough week.last_img read more

BC First Nations clash with commercial fishing boat caught on camera

first_imgAPTN National NewsA clash between First Nations and a commercial fishing boat was recently caught on camera along the northwest central coast of British Columbia.The battle was over the provincial government’s decision to open up the herring fishery.It’s something First Nations people say will further deplete an already failing fishing stocks.APTN’s Tina House has the story.last_img

Meet the commissioners that will lead the MMIW National Inquiry

first_imgCommissioner Qajaq RobinsonAssociate, Borden Ladner Gervais LLPIqaluit, NunavutQajaq Robinson is a graduate of the Akitsiraq Law Program – a partnership between the University of Victoria and Nunavut Arctic College. Born in Iqaluit and raised in Igloolik, Ms. Robinson is a strong Northern advocate, who is fluent in Inuktitut and English . She articled at Maliiganik Tukisiiniakvik, clerked with judges of the Nunavut Court of Justice under the Chief Justice  at the time, Beverley Browne, and then became a Crown prosecutor who worked the circuit court in Nunavut for four years.Ms. Robinson is presently an Associate with Borden Ladner Gervais LLP in Ottawa, Ontario, where she works on Team North, a multi-disciplinary team of 70 lawyers who do a variety of work for First Nation communities in the northern parts of central and western provinces and the territories.  She has worked on a wide range of issues affecting Indigenous rights. Most recently, Ms. Robinson worked as legal counsel at the Specific Claims Tribunal, travelling to First Nations communities across Canada. In addition, Ms. Robinson is the Vice President of Tungasuvvingat Inuit, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to providing cultural and wellness programs to Inuit in Ottawa Commissioner Marilyn PoitrasAssistant ProfessorSaskatoon, SaskatchewanMarilyn Poitras was appointed Assistant Professor in the College of Law, at University of Saskatchewan in 2009. She obtained her L.L.M from Harvard and herL.L.B from the University of Saskatchewan.Prior to being appointed Assistant Professor, her professional life was a fusion of law, governance, community and institutional education. Her expertise and passion is around constitutional/Aboriginal law with a life study of customary laws. Ms. Poitras was a Native Court Worker and moved into the area of constitutional law after articling with the Saskatchewan Department of Justice. She has developed a number of legal education initiatives, including the precursor to the Akitsiraq Law School in Nunavut, where she has been a professor, and the Indigenous People’s Resource Management Program at the University of Saskatchewan.Ms. Poitras has worked in private practice and litigated in every level of court in Canada. She has significant experience in the development of self government with the Beaufort Delta Agreement, treaty implementation with the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Treaty Table Justice Portfolio as well as the revisions to the Saskatchewan Métis Election Process. Ms. Poitras also works on CIDA funded research on ancestral domain and land conflict in Central Mindanao. Ms. Poitras is also the film producer of 7 Minutes, a film about an Indigenous woman from Saskatchewan who was stalked and chased. She is also the editor of numerous Elder’s books for various First Nations in Saskatchewan who tell their own stories of life, residential school and traditional teachings. Chief Commissioner, the Honourable Marion BullerProvincial Court Judge, British ColumbiaMistawasis First Nation, SaskatchewanThe Honourable Judge Marion Buller was appointed the first female First Nations judge in British Columbia in 1994. Prior to being appointed to the Provincial Court bench, Judge Buller worked as a civil and criminal lawyer (1988-1994). Judge Buller served as both a director and president of Canada’s Indigenous Bar Association and has been a member of the B.C. Police Commission and the Law Court Education Society. She was the Commission Counsel for the Caribou-Chilcotin Justice Inquiry and published reports and articles dealing with Aboriginal rights and legal services for First Nations in British Columbia. Judge Buller was instrumental in starting the First Nations Court of British Columbia in 2006.Judge Buller received her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from the University of Victoria, and went on to study law there as well. Judge Buller is currently resident in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, where she sits on the Provincial Court Bench, but maintains band membership with the Mistawasis First Nation in Saskatchewan. Commissioner Michèle AudetteFormer President of Femmes autochtones du Québec (Québec Native Women’s Association)Mani Utenam, QuébecBorn to a French father and Innu mother, in the Innu community of Mani Utenam in Québec, Michèle Audette is a native long-time Innu speaker. She began her political career very early having been elected one of the youngest-ever Presidents of the Québec Native Women’s Association (QNWA), a Native Women’s Association of Canada member organization, where she has advocated actively to support women’s issues. She was instrumental in helping Ecole Nationale D’Administration Publique create an innovative program in the field of Aboriginal public policy. Additionally, from 2004-2009, Ms. Audette served as Deputy Minister at the provincial Secretariat of the Status of Women in Québec. She was the recipient of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.center_img APTN National NewsIndigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett released the names of the five commissioners that will lead the country to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls for the next two years. Here are the biographies that were provided by the department of Indigenous Affairs. Commissioner Brian EyolfsonActing Deputy Director, Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, Legal ServicesCouchiching First Nation, OntarioBrian Eyolfson holds a B.Sc. in psychology, an L.L.B from Queen’s University and an L.L.M, specializing in administrative law, from Osgoode Hall Law School.Mr. Eyolfson was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1994 and has served as a Senior Staff Lawyer with Aboriginal Legal Services in Toronto and as Counsel to the Ontario Human Rights Commission .  He was Counsel to Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto at the Ipperwash Inquiry, and practiced human rights, Aboriginal and administrative law before a variety of tribunals and courts. He is a Vice Chair with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, where he adjudicated and mediated human rights applications, from 2007 to 2016. Mr. Eyolfson is currently acting as the Deputy Director in the Legal Services Branch of the Ontario Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.last_img read more

NFL Coaches Yell At Refs Because It Freakin Works

In the first quarter of a scoreless 2016 AFC Championship game against the New England Patriots, Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos faced third-and-6 from their own 44-yard line. Wide receiver Demaryius Thomas ran a 15-yard out, breaking toward the Broncos’ sideline. He did not catch Manning’s wobbly throw, but there was contact on the play, and Denver’s players and coaching staff appealed to the official for a pass interference call on Patriots cornerback Logan Ryan. They got one, and the Broncos got a first down, scoring the game’s opening touchdown four plays later.On the ensuing drive, the Patriots faced third-and-3 at their own 27-yard line. Rob Gronkowski ran a wheel route up the Broncos’ sideline with T.J. Ward in coverage. As the Patriots tight end turned to look back for the ball, the defender made contact and shoved him, preventing a catch. Both Gronk and Tom Brady yelled for a penalty. The flag did not come, and the Patriots were forced to punt.Similar plays led to different outcomes that benefited the team on the sideline closest to the on-field action. Most NFL refs would likely say they are immune any sideline bias. “If I make a call because a coach is screaming at me on one side of the field and it’s wrong, that’s a bad day for me,” former NFL official Scott Green told us. (The NFL declined to comment.)But as it turns out, a sideline bias in the NFL is real, and it’s spectacular. To prove it, we looked at the rates at which refs call the NFL’s most severe penalties, including defensive pass interference, aggressive infractions like personal fouls and unnecessary roughness, and offensive holding calls, based on where the offensive team ran its play.1Some of this research was published in March in Economic Inquiry.For three common penalties, the direction of the play — that is, whether it’s run toward the offensive or defensive team’s sideline — makes a significant difference. In other words, refs make more defensive pass interference calls on the offensive team’s sideline but more offensive holding calls on the defensive team’s sideline. What’s more, these differences aren’t uniform across the field — the effect only shows up on plays run, roughly, between the 32-yard lines, the same space where coaches and players are allowed to stand during play.The following graphs show the penalty rates per 1,000 plays for defensive pass interference and aggressive defensive penalties, which include unnecessary roughness, personal fouls, unsportsmanlike conduct, and horse-collar tackles.2The data includes regular-season games between 2010 and 2014, and uses coin-toss information provided by Football Outsiders and play-by-play data from Armchair Analysis. To estimate penalty rates, we used a model of penalty outcomes that depends on yard line and which sideline (offensive or defensive team’s) the play was closer to. Additional methodological details can be found here. Refs throw flags for defensive infractions at significantly higher rates when plays are run in the direction of the offensive team’s sideline; near midfield, defensive penalties are called about 50 percent more often on the offensive team’s sideline than the defensive team’s. Close to the end zone, where the sidelines are supposed to be free of coaches and players, these differences are negligible.For offensive flags, that association is reversed, at least on holding penalties.3Offensive pass interference calls didn’t vary by proximity to either team’s sideline. Here’s the rate of holding calls made on outside run plays, which shows how the defensive team’s sideline can help draw flags on the offense. Around midfield, offensive holding gets called about 35 percent more often on plays run at the defensive team’s sideline. So what could be causing this phenomenon?Refs are faced with a near-impossible task. They make judgment calls in real time, relying on just their eyes and their experience. Deprived of the advantages, like instant replay, that we enjoy from the couch, refs have less information to help them resist the normal subconscious urge to draw on external cues for assistance in making borderline calls. In psychology terms, this process is called cue learning. It’s why we laugh longer in the presence of other humans laughing,4Which, in turn, is the reason that many TV comedies use a laugh track. why we eat more in the presence of overweight company, and why our judgment of persuasive speeches is influenced by the audience’s reaction.The most common cue in sports is crowd noise, and because crowd noise almost always supports the home team, the way the fans sway the referees is the No. 1 driver of home-field advantage in sports. And one notable experiment suggests that how loud a crowd is helps refs decide whether an interaction should be penalized. A pair of German researchers showed actual referees old video clips of possible soccer infractions, with crowd noise played at high or low volume. Refs looking at the exact same interactions were more likely to hand out a yellow card when they heard a lot of crowd noise than when the volume was low.It follows, then, that screaming and hat-throwing football personnel may also have an effect on referee choices. In football, this sideline bias even seems to supersede refs’ tendency to support the home team: The differences in the penalty rates from sideline to sideline are several times larger than the differences in penalty rates between the home and away teams.That bias can affect the outcome even when officials have time to confer. In a 2015 playoff game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Detroit Lions, Matthew Stafford threw a third-and-1 pass to Brandon Pettigrew. Officials initially called defensive pass interference on the Cowboys’ Anthony Hitchens.But the flag occurred right in front of the Cowboys sideline. This led to some confusion. It also led to a helmetless Dez Bryant yelling at the official.After conferring with each other, the officials picked up the flag, a decision that Mike Pereira, Fox Sports’ rules analyst and the NFL’s former vice president of officiating, said was incorrect. Brian Burke of Advanced Football Analytics calculates that when the official picked up the flag, the Lions’ chances of winning that game dropped by 12 percentage points.Dallas won 24-20.Check out our latest NFL playoff predictions. read more

Scott Sinclair condemns racial abuse supports need to kick it out

first_imgCeltic winger Scott Sinclair believes racism is becoming acute in football and should be exposed and kicked out and never to be ignored.Earlier this month, Sinclair was subject of racial abuse but was defended by his club’s coach Brendan Rodgers and thanked the winger for handling the case maturely.Sinclair condemned football racism and adds that football should adopt a zero-tolerance approach to racial abuse.“It’s unacceptable, not just in football or sport but in society generally,” said the 29-year-old via Scotsman.“I think it needs to be kicked out. It needs to stop and to be shown that it’s unacceptable to use racial slurs or to abuse the ethnicity of players.“The cup final incident was on social media. I was flicking through some things and came across it.Leicester City, Manchester UnitedMatch Preview: Manchester United vs Leicester City Boro Tanchev – September 13, 2019 Old Trafford is the venue for the Premier League encounter between Manchester United and Leicester City, which kicks off at 16:00 (CET) on Saturday.“It’s one of those things that just shouldn’t be happening. It’s 2018.”“This is what I don’t understand,” he added“When I tweeted I called them uneducated and that’s what they are. They are uneducated in this area; they have black players in their team so it’s very confusing.“Why would someone use that sort of slur towards black players? It’s embarrassing. It’s not acceptable for anyone in society to even think they can use that sort of language, whether they are at a football game or in the street. But it’s always around and it’s such a shame to keep hearing the racial slurs.“I think there’s more of a spotlight on racial abuse now, especially with [Manchester City’s] Raheem Sterling experiencing it down south and speaking out,” he said.last_img read more

Smoking Ban Continues To Advance In The Legislature

first_imgSenator Micciche, speaking to the House Judiciary Committee on Monday afternoon, said he refers to the bill as the “take it outside” act. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Last updated on January 26th, 2018 at 04:09 pmA proposal to ban smoking in bars and restaurants across Alaska gained wide support in the Alaska Legislature. If signed into law, the bill would restrict smoking in public places. One Republican state Representative Gabrielle LeDoux of Anchorage, the chairwoman of the House Rules Committee, killed the same bill in the 2015-16 Legislature. LeDoux, continues to voice her opposition for the bill, and is in a key position that allows her to decide whether it comes up for a final vote. Senate Bill 63, is sponsored by Senator Peter Micciche (R-K-Pen). SB 63 reads, “An Act prohibiting smoking in certain places; relating to education on the smoking prohibition; and providing for an effective date.” Micciche: “Senate Bill 63 does not prohibit outdoor smoking except where near it affects others, such as building entrances and exits. The Bill does not legislate the employment of smokers and nonsmokers, and local government will retain their ability for more restrictive local provisions than the statewide law.” Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-smoking-ban.mp3VmJennifer-on-smoking-ban.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Borough Assembly To Approve KPBSD Budget

first_imgKPBSD submitted their budget for approval to the assembly on April 3, and the assembly is required to determine the total amount of money that will be given to the district within 30 days of the receipt of the budget request. It would also draw $1.3 million from the district’s fund balance to cover the FY19 expenditures of $143.5 million. KPBSD Superintendent Sean Dusek: “Now it’s a lot of work with the assembly and also our public, but I’m confident that everyone will believe that our school district does great things and is a good investment for our kids.” KPBSD asked the borough for $52 million in order to fund the school district to the maximum level. The budget is primarily made up of funding from the borough and the state. The borough assembly will meet tomorrow evening, May 1, at 6 p.m., at the George A. Navarre Borough Building. According to the resolution, the borough is proposing that school funding from local sources for FY2019 be $46,738,432. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A resolution approving the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District Budget is on the consent agenda for the Tuesday, May 1, Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly meeting.last_img read more

Lessons from an Entrepreneurial Editor

first_imgWhile the initial show was a success, Kirkpatrick had to reassess the model going forward. “We had five equal partners and the decision-making process was structured on a consensus basis,” he says. “The democratic model doesn’t really work.”Kirkpatrick said he’s been approached by number of media companies seeking partnerships (and one interested in acquiring Techonomy). Last month, Forbes Media struck a strategic partnership with Techonomy, taking a minority investment in the venture. The partnership with Forbes includes media sponsorship of the Techonomy 2011 conference. Other partners in Techonomy Media today include former Fortune publisher Mike Federle, and Simone Ross, former program director for Fortune’s conference division. Going forward, Kirkpatrick wants to create more conferences for additional verticals and bolster the content side of the business (with help from Forbes), with a mix of blogs, video and other channels. For Kirkpatrick, one of the most impressive tech content models out there is IBM’s Smarter Planet initiative, which offers articles, rich media, data reports and more across a variety of sectors. “For content to be successful it has to be well-created (if it’s video, it has to be well-produced),” says Kirkpatrick. “You need to think about what’s useful, what’s most likely to be picked up. It’s not just about producing the best content anymore but producing things that will be repurposed.” In 2010, former Fortune editor David Kirkpatrick teamed up with other ex-Fortune colleagues to form Techonomy, a new media business aimed at convincing leaders from all sectors that technological and social invention is critical.“I’ve been a wage slave at larger media companies and the journalists who don’t have one of the very few high-paying editorial jobs have to be entrepreneurs,” he says. “For people in journalism today, it shouldn’t be, ‘how do I get a job,’ it’s ‘how do I create a business.’”Kirkpatrick actually owned the Techonomy URL for 15 years before launch (he acquired it from an acquaintance whose business folded).  The original vision for Techonomy was a hybrid of original reporting, opinion, aggregated content and contributed long form journalism, as well as a combination of publishing, teaching, consulting and partnerships. The startup’s debut conference took place in August 2010 featuring speakers such as Bill Gates and former Google CEO Eric Schmidt.Live Events Key To Profitable launch A successful live event can be the building block for an editorial venture. “Look at some of the startups out there—Technorati, paidContent, GigaOM—all started as blogs and became very successful but they initially weren’t highly profitable because it’s hard to support quality digital journalism with digital advertising,” says Kirkpatrick. “It wasn’t until they added a conference component that they became profitable. Conferences are a good business. They can be profitable from the start with minimal capital investment.” The second Techonomy conference will take place Nov. 13-15.last_img read more