In the Land of Gup

first_img“Anybody can tell stories. Liars, and cheats and crooks, for example. But for stories with that Extra Ingredient, ah, for those, even the best storytellers need the Story Waters. Storytelling needs fuel, just like a car, and if you don’t have the Water, you just run out of Steam.”        – Iff the Water Genie in Haroun and the Sea of StoriesIn Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories, all tales are derived from the wondrous Ocean of the Streams of Stories in Gup City on the moon Kahani. One can’t help thinking that Indians must be longtime subscribers to the story water supply of this land. Think of all the fantastic tales that have been handed down in the epics and folklore through the great oral tradition in India, the traveling kathakars and kathputliwallas and just the sheer volume of the written word.In The Land of Gup, you encounter King Chattergy, the Princess Bathcheat (Chitchat) and Prince Bolo (Speak) and indeed these are the favorite words of desis. Get two or three housewives or bureaucrats or chaprasis across a table with cups of steaming chai and you can have a gossip marathon! Every Indian will remember the stories told by inventive grandmothers and great aunts and family cooks. And who can forget the Amar Chitra Katha comics that brought Hindu mythology into the realm of pop culture?Yet, in spite of a vast reservoir of regional literature, writing in English seemed to be reserved for an anointed few and the names of the well-known writers could be counted on two hands – R.K. Narayan, Raja Rao, Nayantara Sahgal, and Aubrey Menen come to mind. And expatriate Indian writers or those of Indian origin were even fewer – V.S.Naipaul, Nirad C. Chaudhri, Bharati Mukherjee and Anita Desai. English was almost an alien tongue, a legacy of the Raj. Salman Rushdie.Now it’s a changed world.You can hardly keep up with all the writing in English that’s pouring out of India and its Diaspora! As Anita Desai said in an interview in the Spanish journal Lateral, “It’s become strong in the last ten or twenty years. When I started to write it certainly wasn’t. There was just a few of us who were writing in English; we had a lot of problems in finding publishers, there were very few readers, and no one seemed very interested at all in our work. I think things changed very dramatically – and I can put a date to it: it was 1980 – when Salman Rushdie published Midnight’s Children, and it had such a huge success in the West.”Indeed, Midnight’s Children seemed to break all mental and psychological barriers for Indians wanting to write in English. It was as if the story water taps had been turned on full blast and Indian writers could speak in their own voices. Rushdie had invented almost a new language, an English that was more outsized and outrageous than the original, an English that was an Indian language. It was an English hammered and melded in street smarts and darkened cinemas, the sounds of the bazaar and the contemporary cacophony of India. Kavita Daswani.Around this time came Vikram Seth’s The Golden Gate, a unique voice – an entire novel in verse that had nothing to do with India. The success of both these books in the west set the stage for the big boom in Indian writing. Amitav Ghosh, Rohinton Mistry, Pico Iyer, Amit Chaudhuri, Shashi Tharoor, Vikram Chandra, Kiran Desai and Upamanyu Chatterjee were some of the star writers getting enormous advances, bagging big prizes and creating buzz from London to New York to Bombay.Midnight’s Children won the Booker Prize and also the Booker of Bookers, Vikram Seth won the Booker for A Suitable Boy and Arundhati Roy for The God of Small Things. Then came Jhumpa Lahiri’s Pulitzer for Interpreter of Maladies and then of course the Big One, the Nobel Prize for Literature awarded to Sir V.S.Naipaul. This year Arundhati Roy was awarded the US-based Lannan Foundation’s annual $350,000 Prize for Cultural Freedom.In India there’s been a virtual explosion of Indian writing in English. Pankaj Mishra, Raj Kamal Jha, David Davidar, Shashi Despande and Sunil Khilnani are just a few of the names being courted and published in east and west. In some ways it doesn’t even matter where people are living anymore, as globalization has erased literary national boundaries. Bombay, London, New York are all just a flight away and the Internet has ensured that geographical boundaries are just that. English writing has flowered in the Diaspora too and Indian writers in the U.S., Canada and U.K. have made significant contributions from Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni to Akhil Sharma to Manil Suri. Divakaruni, who won the 1966 American Book Award for her very first book Arranged Marriage, has become a household name with a strong following. Her books Mistress of Spices, Sister of My Heart and Vine of Desire have all been well received and she recently stepped into young adult territory with her book Neela: Victory Song.Rohinton Mistry, who migrated to Canada at the age of 23, worked in a Toronto Bank as a clerk in the accounting department for many years and began writing short stories in his spare time.Banking’s loss was literature’s gain and his first book of short stories was Swimming Lessons and Other stories from Firozsha Baag. His first novel Such a Long Journey was short listed for the Booker Prize and won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for the best book of the year; A Fine Balance was a Booker Prize finalist and Family Matters was also longlisted for the 2002 Booker Prize. Tanuja Hidier Desai.Akhil Sharma’s novel, An Obedient Father bagged the Ernest Hemmingway Foundation/PEN award. London-born journalist Hari Kunzru was named “Young Travel Wrtier of the Year” by the Observer. His very first novel turned him into an international star and got him one of the biggest advances.Manil Suri, a professor of mathematics in the University of Maryland, made a stunning debut with the critically acclaimed Death of Vishnu, which bagged scores of prestigious prizes and was released in 23 editions worldwide.The list of South Asian American writers includes Meena Alexander, author of several books including Fault Lines; Anita Desai’s daughter Kiran Desai, whose debut novel Hullaballoo in the Guava Orchard heralded an idiosyncratic new voice; Bharti Kirchner who successfully moved from being a cookbook author to a novelist, with three successful novels to her credit, Sharmila’s Book, Shiva Dancing and Darjeeling.Then you have Mohsin Hamid, who has written the critically acclaimed novel about contemporary Pakistan, Moth Smoke; Kamila Shamsie, whose first novel In the City by the Sea received the prime minister’s award for literature in Pakistan, has written the well-received Salt and Saffron; Vineeta Vijayaraghavan, a Harvard graduate whose first novel is Motherland; last year Thrity Umrigar , a journalist who was a recipient of the prestigious Nieman fellowship at Harvard, wrote Bombay Time and from Sohrab Homi Fracis came Ticket to Minto: Stories of India and America, which won the 2001 IOWA Short Fiction Award. The list of noted young writers continues to grow with names such as Suketu Mehta whose non-fiction book on Bombay and Alphabeth, a novel are both to be published this Spring; Mira Kamdar, at the Policy institute of the New School, wrote Motiba’s Tattoos, a poignant memoir of her Gujarati family roots, which was very well received. Recently Brooklyn-based writer Meera Nair received instant fame with her debut book of stories, Video Nights.Just this year readers were introduced to a wonderful new voice, Samrat Upadhyay, a Nepalese writer whose debut novel The Guru of Love was just so seductive that it was a temptation to read the entire book at one sitting. Another recent noteworthy first book was Monsoon Diary by Shoba Narayan, an engaging memoir with recipes.Indians writers are also moving up the food chain to the screen. Last year Merchant Ivory Productions made a film out of V.S. Naipaul’s The Mystic Masseur (Merchant had earlier made In Custody from Anita Desai’s novel). A made for TV film, directed by Mira Nair, was also made out of Abraham Verghese’s book, In My Own Country. A film has also been made of Rohinton Mistry’s Such a Long Journey and Bapsi Sidhwa’s novel Cracking India was made into Deepa Mehta’s ‘Earth.’ Amitav GhoshAs if awards and critical acclaim (not to mention world-wide notoriety as the world’s most famous exile and fatwah-holder) were not enough, Salman Rushdie reached another distinction this year: His book Midnight’s Children was made into a play by the Royal Shakespeare Company and after a successful run in the U.K., was brought to the United States in association with Columbia University and the University of Michigan. Rarely has a book been given such an honor for the play was accompanied by a month long Midnight’s Children Humanities Festival with artists, writers and scholars coming together to discuss the ideas embedded in the book.All these multiple success stories seem to have certainly stirred up something in the Diaspora – in this universe of physicians and engineers and software technicians we are suddenly seeing so many more new writers emerging. Indian names seem to be on all sorts of books. Just this past year there have been books by first time authors like Tanuja Hidier Desai, whose young adult book, Born Confused was critically acclaimed.Recently Monica Ali, a Dhaka-born writer, was selected for the literary magazine Granta’s “Best of Young British Novelists.” It features her Dinner with Dr. Azad, along with works by Hari Kunzru and Zadie Smith. As Arul Louis, an editor at Daily News notes, “This selection often portends literary fame – at least in Britain. Salman Rushdie, Shiva Naipaul, Martin Amis, Ben Okri, Kazuo Ishiguro and Hanif Kureishi are among those who made the Granta selection in their youth. Therefore, Ali’s first novel, Bricklane, is causing a buzz in Britain.” Nor are Indian writers limited to fiction – although nonfiction sometimes reads more like incredible fiction, given the state of the world! Pick up any journal and you’re bound to see the name of Fareed Zakaria; switch channels on TV and you’re bound to see his face. Zakaria, the editor of Newsweek International, is a media star whose latest book The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad is making waves; then you have Shashi Tharoor and Pico Iyer, two remarkable writers who segue from fiction to non-fiction with grace. Tharoor, the author of The Great Indian Novel and Riot is also the author of India: From Midnight to the Millennium which was on Bill Clinton’s reading list before his India trip.Pico Iyer, who has delighted readers worldwide with his insightful travel books, is also the author of beautiful novels including Cuba and the Night and Abandon. And then of course, you have Deepak Chopra, a virtual one-man conglomerate with his best-selling books, audios and lecture circuit. Surely such major success stories will propel young writers into the field of non-fiction too.So what’s happening now on the writing scene and how have all these success stories impacted emerging writers in the Diaspora? Is the boom in South Asian writing continuing or is it on the wane? Little India spoke to a number of people in the know to find out what’s happening. Suketu MehtaUna Chaudhuri, Professor of English at New York University, says, “There’s been a steady stream of novels and short stories and there are some writers who are well established so they have a presence which South Asian writers just didn’t have before. There’s definitely a difference now; there’s more of a sense of mainstreaming than being this new phenomenon.”She adds, “In the general cultural sphere, beyond the literary production, beyond novels and fiction, I think there is tremendous amount of cultural activity amongst South Asians. The area interests and excites me is drama and theater and I’ve been noticing wonderful new works, new plays, both full length plays and short plays, readings and workshops by South Asian Americans. I’m really impressed by the quality and the engagement as well as the quantity of this writing.” Young South Asians in America seem to be confronting their hyphenated identities and their splintered worlds and many are expressing these issues through the written word. Says Chaudhuri, “I think that’s a sign of it being a young person’s field. They say that people always start out by writing their own autobiography – that you have to get your own life out of your system before you can move on to other subjects. I guess the first books are often focused on people’s own experiences and often those experiences are of dislocation and that seems to be a big theme. I think that’s really opened up and has its own vocabulary and its own linguistic style.” Manil SuriThese young writers have grown up here and so really they are talking about America, their America that embraces their roots and their parents’ past. Observes Chaudhuri: “They are often keenly aware of the Indian cultural background. I’m sometimes amazed at how much seriously and deeply connected some of these younger writers are to issues of Indian identity, history and culture, because they have received them in a more purified way, either by reading about them or through parents.”She points out that the younger generation is also bringing home their close connection to American culture and in a sense educating their parents and changing their parents’ perceptions and making them more open to non-traditional career choices like literature and theater. And of course, big wins by writers like Jhumpa Lahiri make it more permissible to work in these fields! However, there are many complex reasons for the explosion of Indian writing in the west, and one is surely the more hospitable environment. “It’s part of American identity politics; there’s been this multicuturalization of mainstream American culture and African-American and East-Asian Americans kind of led the way and there were successes like the Joy Luck Club,” says Chaudhuri. “It’s also now become a very mainstream concern. This whole concern with mixed identity and hybridism and dislocation. Publishing houses are also open to these new voices, voices other than the Middle American, Anglo white experience.” Pico IyerAnna M. Ghosh, of Scovil Chichak Galen Literary Agency, has seen an increasing number of books by Indian writers coming across her table. She works on a wide variety of books and recently sold Kathleen Cox’s Vastu Living and is currently working with Thomas John, the acclaimed Indian chef of Mantram, a Boston restaurant, on a cookbook.“I seem to get a lot of query letters from Indians regarding all kinds of books – science, history, politics, how to get into graduate school,” she says. “It’s a whole range of topics and they are not necessarily writing about India at all; they just happen to be Indians who are writing books. I’ve found many of them to be very accomplished, and they’ve got very good credentials. ”Ghosh recently worked with Madhusree Mukerjee on The Land of Naked People: Encounters with Stone Age Islanders. She is also working with journalist Chitra Raghavan, who has written several cover stories for US News & World Report, on her book about the Secret Service.Ghosh, however, has not seen Indians writing genre fiction like mysteries or romances, though she thinks science fiction would be a particularly good field to tackle: “I always think it’s a very rich area for an Indian author or someone from an Indian background. We have a rich tradition of gods and goddesses and all kinds of epic drama. I loved it as a child, reading all the Amar Chitra stories. I think it’s an opportunity for someone to mine.” How difficult is it to find an agent especially if the writer is not known? “It’s extremely easy if you have something that agents want,’ explains Ghosh. In fact, you’ll be fighting off agents if you’ve got something that is really desirable. If you’ve got something that is really not publishable or is difficult to publish then it’s going to be very, very difficult. Of course, sometimes you just have to find one person with a vision for it – someone who can see the potential.”She also recommends researching the publishers who would be suitable, since publishing houses run the whole gamut from highly specialized to general houses to the academic university presses. If it’s a book about multiculturalism or feminism, it might be a good fit for a university press and indeed some of these houses also print fiction and may not be as competitive as the big houses such as Random House or Simon and Schuster. Jhumpa LahiriThere are many new small publishing houses too such as the N.J. based Silicon Press which recently published Bell Labs: Life in the Crown Jewel by Narain Gehani, which documents the metamorphosis at this giant American company; and a work of fiction Fifty-Fifty by Robbie Clipper Sethi, whose first book of short stories, The Bride wore Red was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection.And then of course, there are many options to self publish now and e-books are another route. Sometimes things just work out in a roundabout way: Ghosh recalls a self-published book that came to her desk just for foreign rights, but she was able to find it a publisher.  Chitra Banerjee DivakaruniAnd are those big advances that make aspiring writers salivate, still there? Says Ghosh, “You hear of big books; but sometimes those books do well, sometimes nothing happens. A lot of first novels, which are sold for a lot of money, they don’t necessarily ever sell enough copies to ever justify that and that does make it hard for the writer the next time around.” Anna M GhoshTo aspiring writers, Ghosh says, “Think of what you’re asking people to do, you’re asking them to spend their days and their 25 bucks to buy your book and read it. You want people to read your book and then tell everyone else how much they loved it. So really don’t send it out until you’re sure you’ve put in what it takes. A lot of people feel, ‘Well now’s the time to send it. India is hot, let me be the first person to do it.’ The only people who are going to survive anything is people who’ve got real talent.”Jennifer Hershey, vice president and editorial director at Putnam, is also well aware of the boom in Indian writing. “There may have been a point at which the sheer novelty of the Indian culture and experience was so appealing that books could be published almost purely on that basis,” she says. “Now that it’s become familiar and more books have been published, it’s probably not so much of a phenomenon and is something which has integrated itself into publishing.”Asked if she felt if the big name Indian writers had made it easier for more Indian writers to be published, she says, “I definitely think so, in the same way for a long time African-American women’s fiction wasn’t published and now there’s a lot of African-American women writing. It’s the same kind of thing: some writers break down perceptions within the publishing industry and then it becomes a lot easier for everyone.”  V. S. NaipaulIncreasingly, Indian writers are looking to cross geographical boundaries and write past color lines and maps. How easily would mainstream publishing houses accept Indian writing that is not about India or ethnicity? Says Hershey: “The ideal is that you would describe a novelist as a novelist and not as an Indian novelist. That’s the point one should get to and I think we are getting closer to that. I think it’s partly human nature that people are intrigued by cultures that are different from their own, but I do agree it would be nice if we’d get to that at some point.” Arundati RoyPutnam will be publishing For Matrimonial Purposes, the debut novel of Indian journalist Kavita Daswani in June and Hershey has this advice to give to aspiring writers: ” Work really hard to get your book in the best possible shape and then look for a literary agent. You have to be brave and be willing to show it to people and be willing to sometimes experience some rejection before you get to the point where you can find someone that wants to take it on.”All those who loved Manil Suri’s The Death of Vishnu will be glad to know that he’s currently working on the second in the trilogy, The Age of Shiva: “It brings to life the essential characteristics that Shiva is supposed to represent: asceticism, eroticism and destruction, through human characters and events.” Writers become writers in different ways and as Suri explains about his ambitions as he was growing up, “I liked to write, but no, I didn’t think I would become a writer with a capital W.” Asked as to how easy or difficult it was to get published, he explains, “I was very lucky. I got accepted at the MacDowell Colony (a retreat for writers and artists), where one of the colonists read my first chapter and suggested an agent who he thought would be perfectly suited to my work. He was right. When I sent her the manuscript, she agreed to represent me. She in turn knew which editors to send the manuscript to, and got several publishers interested as a result.” To aspiring writers itching to get published and cash in on the big boom in Indian writing, he cautions: “Don’t be in too much of a hurry. It’s a luxury to be able to gain proficiency in one’s craft before one’s first book or collection of short stories is published. Today’s competitive market is very unforgiving about anything less than the best you can give.” Related Itemslast_img read more

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Tourist Arrivals from U.S. Increased by Over 6%, Says India

first_imgIndia’s tourism ministry has said that the number of tourists coming to the country from the United States increased 6.17 percent in 2017 over the previous year. The Indian government released its figures of foreign tourist arrivals from the United States, rejecting a recent American report that said that the number declined during the same period. The U.S. National Travel and Tourism Office (NTTO) claimed in a report last week that the number of Americans touring India fell by 7 percent in 2017 as compared to 2016.  India’s Ministry of Tourism has countered that number, saying in a statement that foreign tourist arrivals “from USA to India has never declined since 2010.”  The ministry clarified that “the Foreign Tourist Arrivals (FTAs) in India from the USA during the year 2017 have registered a positive growth of 6.17% over the year 2016.”  A year wise list released by the Indian department shows that the number of American tourists visiting India was 980,688 in 2011, marking a 5.30 percent rise over the previous year. It increased to 1,039,947 in 2012, showing a growth rate of 6.04 percent. In 2013, 1,085,309 Americans toured India. In 2014 the number was 1,118,983 and in 2015 it went up to 1,213,624. In 2016 and 2017, the number of Americans visiting India was 1,296,939 and 1,376,919, respectively.Between January and August this year, 926,192 Americans visited India, which is 8.18 percent higher than the corresponding numbers during the same time last year. The NTTO said in its report that traveler volume is based on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Advanced Passenger Information System wherein all airlines are required to electronically submit passenger data on flights arriving into and departing from the United States. The ministry said that the NTTO numbers were flawed as that the source of data for the report is only airlines reporting. “In the cases where direct flight between USA and India is not operating, it is not known whether the final destination or the transit destination is reported as India by the passengers,” the tourism ministry’s statement said. Moreover, the Indian ministry said that departures at international check posts other than airports were not captured in the report and therefore, it may not contain the complete information on the outbound departures from the United States. It added that the Bureau of Immigration of India (BoI) compiles the data of FTA from records of scanned passport of each person arriving at all the international check posts in India, which include airports, sea ports and land check posts. Related ItemsTourismUnited Stateslast_img read more

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Cipla, Lupin Deny Report on Takeda Talks

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Sharp Rise in Outbound Remittances From India, Shows RBI Data

first_imgThe outflow of remittances from individual residents of India during the month of January 2018 set a new record, with $1.2 billion being sent abroad, according to data from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI).The outflow was as much as $8.17 billion between April 2017 and January 2018, the Economic Times reported, citing the RBI figures. The figure has more than doubled from the same period last year as more people are paying for children’s education in universities overseas, foreign tourism and spending money on gifting relatives staying abroad, the statistics showed. As much as $4.6 billion was sent by Indians overseas during the first 10 months of 2016-17.Resident Indians can send up to $250,000 per year to their relatives overseas for gifts or donations, maintenance of close relatives abroad, business trips, and medical treatment or studies abroad, besides other reasons.Approximately 90 per cent of the outbound remittances were meant for education, tourism, and payments and gifts to relatives in foreign countries, the report added. Although outflows were limited to $50,000 a year initially, the amount was increased gradually to $250,000 a year per person.“It is clear Indians are traveling abroad more and also high net worth individuals are encouraging their offspring to study abroad and sponsor their education,” Moin Ladha, a partner at law firm Khaitan & Co, was quoted as saying in the report.The trend had earlier prompted Western Union to offer its Indian users an option for outward remittances. “We have got this outbound license to send money out of India. With the Indian economy growing stronger, people want to send money abroad to relatives, to invest in businesses and to students overseas. You can pay me in rupees and I can pay in any currency,” Western Union chief executive Hikmet Ersek had said then.In 2017, RBI data showed that the money sent abroad for education grew to $278 million in September 2017 from $160 million a year ago. Also, the money sent abroad for travel increased to $398 million in September 2017 from $217 million in 2016, and that spent for the upkeep of close relatives grew from $160 million in September 2016 to $227 million in September 2017, according to a Business Standard report.It is not just the outward remittances that have grown. India is also expected to receive increased remittances from abroad this year. India’s remittances are expected to grow at 2.5 per cent in 2018, according to the World Bank report released on Oct. 3. India was also the top remittance receiving nation from the United Arab Emirates in the fourth quarter of 2017, revealed statistics from the UAE’s monetary authority. India received a total of Dh14.8 billion, which comprised 34.2 per cent of the total remittances worth Dh43.2 billion during the fourth quarter. Related ItemsEconomyRemittancelast_img read more

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Patna’s more-than-a-century-old heritage market demolished for Smart City project

first_imgThe over 100-year-old Gole Market, a unique heritage building constructed as Patna’s first planned municipal market, has been demolished by local authorities as part of a Smart City project. The demolition work began on Friday and by Sunday the historic landmark, located in the heart of Bihar’s capital and endowed with beautiful red-tiled roof, was reduced to a skeletal shell.“The Gole Market was demolished as part of a major redevelopment project of the railway station area under the Smart City initiative. Other markets lining the streets are also being knocked down as part of the mega project,” Patna Municipal Commissioner Anupam Kumar Suman told PTI. As part of this Smart City project, the now-dismantled Gole Market, located near Patna Junction, will make way for a seven-storeyed commercial complex and a modern municipal market along with a vending zone will come up in the area adjoining the Station Road, he said. Popularly known as Gole Market, among the local people, it was Patna’s first planned municipal market designed by architect Joseph Fearis Munnings while he was planning the layout of the ‘New Capital’ city of colonial Patna after the creation of the new province of Bihar and Orissa in 1912. Despite the historical value of the building, the demolition drew feeble protest from citizens of the city, but many people in Patna are angered by the move. “This is just madness. It was a historical building and should have been preserved. But, instead of restoring and reusing it as a cafe or something, the corporation razed it,” said city-based researcher and author Arun Singh.“One by one the local government is knocking down heritage buildings in the city. This is an attempt to erase the colonial history of Patna in the name of development,” he alleged. In December last year, the 133-year-old Anjuman Islamia Hall, perhaps the first public hall of Patna, was demolished to make way for a modern complex. The heritage market had faced decades of neglect and its occupant shopkeepers had been feeling the shadow of the wrecking ball for years as local authorities had planned a redevelopment project much earlier, a local shopkeeper, who did not wish to be named, said. “My grandfather had a meat shop in it during the British time, and elite of the city would come in their cars to buy meat, fish, chicken, eggs, grocery and milk. It should have been preserved,” he said. City-based 84-year-old architect and INTACH Patna Chapter Convener J.K. Lall also expressed shock and anger over the demolition of Gole Market.“It was a unique single-storeyed building with a raised central hexagonal core topped with elegant red-tiled roof and two flanks came out of it and again it was topped with red tiles of the colonial-era Burn & Co. It was a perfect building and a perfect setting for a heritage cafe,” he told PTI.“Smart City also means preserving our architectural legacy and not just building new ones,” he said. PMC Commissioner Suman, when asked why the building was demolished, said, the Gole Market was “coming in the middle” of the layout of the Smart City project plan.“There were suggestions made to us by a few heritage lovers to preserve the building and reuse it as a cafe. We tried but the market structure was coming in the way of the plan. So, we had no option left but to knock it down,” he said.“Also, besides the fact that it was designed 100 years ago by Munnings as the first municipal market, there was not much heritage value to it. And, sometimes we have to lose something old to build a new, better future,” the municipal commissioner said. However, the iron shell of the building and whatever can be salvaged will be stored and later reused in a new gazebo at the site, Suman said. “That gazebo will be built with new material and old material from the dismantled Gole Market. We are trying to look into our archives to know about the history of the building, which along with old pictures would be displayed there, so that people will know there was a Gole Market here,” he said. Retired bureaucrat R.N. Dash, who served as the district magistrate of Patna from 1972-74 and Divisional Commissioner from 1983-85, said the demolition was a “wrong move” and that restoration and proper rehabilitation of local shopkeepers should have been planned instead. “The overall master plan should have ensured the preservation of the market and other heritage buildings, and Smart City project should have factored that in. Converting it into a cafe was a good idea and people coming to these complexes would have visited too, so it was a win-win situation,” he said. Ironically, Gole Market was also listed as a heritage building in a 2008 Bihar goverment publication — Patna: A Monumental History. Mr. Singh, whose book Patna – Khoya Hua Shahar came out early this year, talks about the history and glory days of this market, located in what is termed officially as the New Market area, falling between the railway station rotary and the Patna GPO roundabout. “In its heydays, it had a rose garden around it and six routes leading to it from the streets around it.“British people including European women would visit there as would the Indians in their cars. Instead of restoring old charm, as done world over, Patna is wilfully destroying its own heritage,” he rued.last_img read more

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‘Laddoos’ overdose leads to divorce of Uttar Pradesh couple

first_imgA resident of Uttar Pradesh’s Meerut district has sought divorce on grounds that his wife, under the influence of a tantrik (shaman), was giving him only ‘laddoos’ to eat.The man approached a family court where he said that on the instructions of the tantrik, his wife gave him four laddoos to eat in the morning and four in the evening. He was not allowed to eat anything else.The man said that he had been ailing for some time and his wife approached the ‘tantrik’ who asked her to make her husband eat only the laddoos.Officials at the family counselling centre were puzzled over the pretext for seeking divorce.“We can call the couple for counselling, but we can not treat the woman for being superstitious. She firmly believes that the laddoos will cure her husband and is unwilling to accept otherwise,” said a counsellor.last_img read more

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Navarro catches fire late as San Sebastian forces three-way tie for 4th

first_imgLOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The Blazers have now lost six of their last seven games to drop to 3-10.The Scores:SAN SEBASTIAN 73 – Navarro 16, Calisaan 11, Costelo 10, Bulanadi 8, Valdez 8, Baetiong 7, David 5, Ilagan 3, Calma 2, Mercado 2, Gayosa 1, Baytan 0, Capobres 0, Quipse 0.ST. BENILDE 61 – Leutcheu 15, Naboa 15, Castor 7, Belgica 5, Domingo 5, San Juan 4, Young 4, Johnson 3, Mercado 2, Dixon 1, Pili 0, Sta. Maria 0.Quarters: 13-10, 30-20, 51-42, 73-61.ADVERTISEMENT E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City View comments Lyceum refuses to be content with Final Four spot MOST READ Michael Calisaan chipped in a double-double with 11 markers and 11 rebounds, while Ryan Costelo got 10 for San Sebastian, as it kept itself in the Final Four race with its 6-6 record and forcing a three-way logjam at fourth place with Letran and EAC.“I guess the boys really want to be here. Hopefully, everybody will step up so that we won’t have a difficult time getting to the Final Four,” said coach Egay Macaraya.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Golden Stags had a hard time pulling away against the Blazers before Navarro drilled back-to-back triples in the payoff period to grab a 70-52 lead with 3:34 remaining.Clement Leutcheu paced St. Benilde with 15 points and nine rebounds against eight turnovers, while Unique Naboa also had 15 markers and three boards. Renzo Navarro. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netRenzo Navarro waxed hot in the fourth quarter as he led San Sebastian to a 73-61 win over St. Benilde Thursday in the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament at the Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.The diminutive playmaker went 5-of-6 from beyond the arc to finish with 16 points, 12 of which coming in the payoff period to help the Golden Stags hold off the Blazers.ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City PLAY LIST 01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Gameslast_img read more

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Chot chooses Gilas veterans

first_imgReyes put Carl Bryan Cruz, Mac Belo and the injured Raymond Almazan in the freezer for this match, but reiterated that the Gilas roster could change when the Filipinos battle Chinese Taipei at home on Monday.“Basically, we took into account the team that we are playing [today],” Reyes said after revealing the final roster. “And we also took into account our health and injury situation.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe 6-foot-7 Almazan still has a swollen ankle, and could be available for the Taiwanese.“I spoke to the three of them and they took it very professionally and very well,” Reyes added. “This is just the 12-man roster for [Friday’s] game. For Taiwan, it would be different. Every game could change.” QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jayson Castro. Photo from Fiba.comGilas Pilipinas takes the first step in its bid to return to the World Cup on Friday, clashing with Japan in Tokyo with a roster coach Chot Reyes feels is suited to defeat the Japanese on the road.After close to three weeks of hard work, Reyes made the final three cuts on his 15-man pool, basically sticking out with tested veterans led by Jayson Castro at the guard spot, Japeth Aguilar at forward and naturalized center Andray Blatche and June Mar Fajardo in the middle.ADVERTISEMENT Kevin Alas will be the third point guard at Reyes’ disposal after Castro and Kiefer Ravena.Calvin Abueva, RR Pogoy, Matthew Wright, Gabe Norwood, Allein Maliksi and Troy Rosario complete the team.Team Philippines has had a long record of success against the Japanese, its last loss to the hosts happening in 2004 in the Fiba Asia Challenge where the Filipinos lost by 60 points.Japan has thrown in everything against the Philippines of late, including former NBA player Yuta Tabuse, to no avail.It will be bannered by naturalized forward Ira Brown in the 7 p.m. (6 p.m. in Manila) game at Komazawa gym at the Olympic Park in Tokyo.ADVERTISEMENT Del Rosario gets Man of the Year, Hall of Fame nod Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion The talented 6-foot-10 center Joji Takeuchi will still be the Japanese’s main man, though the Filipinos have ample knowledge of how he plays, which will be critical in Reyes’ defensive scheme.There are a total of 80 countries taking part in this hectic qualifying process, with the Philippines shooting to become one of eight countries coming from Asia to play in the World Cup in China in 2019. CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ Read Next View commentslast_img read more

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Dodgers win 10th in row, beat Rockies; Bellinger 2 HRs

first_imgIncorporated were the seventh and eighth innings when they scored five consecutive runs on four wild pitches by Adam Ottavino (1-2).According to the Elias Sport Bureau, the Dodgers were the first team in the live-ball era (since 1920) to score at least five runs on wild pitches.“These games are played by human beings,” Rockies manager Bud Black said. “Games like this happen. They’re painful when you’re on this end of it but we’ve had our share where it’s gone the other way.”The two teams combined to throw eight wild pitches, which according to STATS is the most in a single game since 1913. Dodgers starter Brandon McCarthy threw three, one of them scoring a run.Bellinger now has 24 home runs, helping the Dodgers stretch their longest string since they won 10 straight in August 2013. Colorado lost its season-worst fifth in a row.ADVERTISEMENT What ‘missteps’? WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ MOST READ Los Angeles Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger watches his two-run home run against the Colorado Rockies during the third inning of a baseball game in Los Angeles, Sunday, June 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles Dodgers unleashed yet another weapon to continue their winning streak.The vaunted wild pitch.ADVERTISEMENT World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Lopez saves match point, beats Cilic in Queen’s final Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken The Dodgers have hit at least one home run in 17 consecutive games, tying their record in Los Angeles. Their franchise record is 24 consecutive games set by Brooklyn in 1956.Kenley Jansen got five outs for his 17th save, and his first career double and RBI to drive in the Dodgers’ final run.Jansen also walked his first batter of the season after striking out 51 in a dominant year.“That was a good streak,” Roberts said. “That was historical.”Colorado led 6-4 when Ottavino took over with two on and two out in the seventh. He walked a batter and threw a wild pitch that allowed one run to score. Ottavino then threw another wild pitch for the tying run, and when catcher Tony Wolters couldn’t find the ball, Austin Barnes raced home from second.“He had third base, he was going hard, took the turn around third base and the play is in front of him,” Roberts said. “At that point you have to be instinctual.”The Dodgers added five more runs in the eighth, the first two scoring on another pair of wild pitches by Ottavino. He had thrown three wild pitches this season before the problems at Dodger Stadium.The Rockies could not stop their losing skid despite taking a 5-0 lead off McCarthy. The Dodgers came back for their 16th win in 17 games.BELLINGER POWERHe now has six multihomer games this season, a Dodgers’ rookie record and second all-time to Mark McGwire’s seven in 1987. He also beat out an infield hit and made a diving catch in right field. The Dodgers made some history Sunday, albeit with a great assist from the Colorado Rockies, scoring a record five runs in the final two innings on four wild pitches by Adam Ottavino.Add the almost requisite home-run production from rookie sensation Cody Bellinger — this time he had two — and the Dodgers had a 12-6 comeback win over the Rockies for their 10th consecutive victory.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“That was a long, crazy game,” said Dodgers manager Dave Roberts.The game went four hours and 19 minutes, making it the longest nine-inning game since Dodger Stadium opened in 1962. LATEST STORIES “(Dodgers broadcaster) Manny Mota comes in to remind me every day, I already got paid for yesterday,” Bellinger said. “That’s a good reminder.”TRAINER’S ROOMRockies: OF Carlos Gonzalez missed his third consecutive start with a sore shoulder. Black said Gonzalez did take some early batting practice and was showing improvement.Dodgers: Put OF Franklin Gutierrez on the 10-day disabled list with another bout of Ankylosing Spondylitis, an immune arthritic condition he has battled since 2011. The team is uncertain if he will be ready to return after the 10 days off. The team called up infielder Mike Freeman from Triple-A Oklahoma City to his roster spot.UP NEXTRockies: RHP German Marquez (5-3, 3.92 ERA) is scheduled to start the Monday opener of a three-game series against the Giants in San Francisco. The rookie has allowed only three earned runs in his last three starts (1.93 ERA) and is 3-1 with a 3.00 ERA in six road starts.Dodgers: LHP Rich Hill (4-3, 4.73) will attempt to pitch into the sixth inning for the first time this season when he starts Monday against the Angels. It will mark his 10th start. In his last start Wednesday against the Mets, he allowed one run on four hits in five innings.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 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BCCI faces heat over FEMA violation in IPL

first_imgThe BCCI is under scanner of the Enforcement Directorate (ED) over alleged violation of FEMA during the IPL auctions.  The contentious issue is the base fee agreed upon between the BCCI and 72 foreign players. The forex payment guarantees are in clear violation of FEMA or the Foreign Exchange Management Act. Documents obtained by Headlines Today show that the total base fee guarantee extended by the BCCI was worth 13.4 million dollars or Rs 62 crore. The foreign exchange guarantee was given by the board without permission from the RBI. Foreign exchange transactions made during IPL 2 in South Africa too are under the scanner. These transactions were made with entities like Cricket South Africa and the sponsors. The BCCI had advanced 2.5 million dollars to enable budgeted costs of Cricket South Africa.  Several transactions made to persons residing outside India and the sources of these funds too are being investigated. Juhi Chawla under scannerMeanwhile, Juhi Chawla, a co-owner of the Kolkata Knight Riders, has come under the scanner for alleged FEMA violation.  An ED note accessed by Headlines Today reveals that 40 lakh shares of Chawla were transferred to a Mauritius-based company. The shares were transferred at par in violation of FEMA.  The norms stipulate that since the shares were that of an unlisted company, they should have been valued by a chartered accountant.  The ED report also cites similar irregularities in Kings XI Punjab and Rajasthan Royals.last_img read more

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IPL 4 auction: Will Ganguly, Lara find takers today

first_imgFile photo of fomer Indian captain Sourav Ganguly.This year’s auction saw money splurging on players for record deals but there were some big names who, surprisingly, found no takers from among the 10 franchisees.Having doubled his base price to $4,00,000 (Rs 1.84 cr), former Indian captain Sourav Ganguly was in for a rude shock when he failed to find any bidders at the auction from amongst the 10 IPL teams.Ganguly wasn’t the only big name who was given a cold shoulder by the franchises as even former West Indies skippers Chris Gayle and Brian Lara were snubbed.While Lara hasn’t played much of cricket in the last four years and does not have much experience in the shortest format of the game, Gayle’s fate was unexpected.The big Jamaican is a proven T20 cricketer with his attacking strokeplay and useful off-spinners and was one of the most talked about signing in the first IPL auction where Kolkata Knight Riders inked a deal with him. Besides, there are other names like England’s Graeme Swann and South African Herschelle Gibbs who weren’t picked.While Ganguly and Lara failed to prove their prowess for the highly demanding IPL seasons, doubts over the availability of Gayle and Swann, arguably the best off-spinner in the world at the moment, for the event could have cost them a place in the Twenty20 extravaganza.But with no takers on Day One of the auction, it is still not the end of the road for the unsold players as they will be up for sale on Sunday after the first round of auction. But it is highly unlikely that any of these names will fetch anything more than their base price. It was surprising that Ganguly decided to double his base price from $2,00,000 even though it was clear that he was not likely to get too many bidders.advertisementBut there could be some thought in that move. At Rs 1.84 crore, franchisees may have found Ganguly an expensive signing and preferred to put in their money on younger players.But on Sunday, Ganguly could well be seen in the camp of Pune Warriors for the base price.Those who remain unsold: Tamim Iqbal, Chamara Kapugedera, Murali Kartik, Ajantha Mendis, Graeme Swann, James Anderson, Dilhara Fernando, Luke Wright, Matt Prior, Mark Boucher, Graeme Manou, Brian Lara, Herschelle Gibbs, Jesse Ryder, Sourav Ganguly and Chris Gayle.FAQ’sWhat are marquee players? Those players, who went under the hammer first and are picked according to a combination of their valuation and star power. These players will be retained by their franchisees for 3 editions. For this year’s auction, there are 27 marquee players.How many teams will be participating in IPL-4? Ten. This includes the eight existing teams and two news teams – Team Kochi and Pune Warriors.What is the total purse for each franchisee? $ 9 million. But the teams that have retained some players will have their budgets reduced as the price of such players.What is player retention? Each of the eight franchisees, who were part of the last three editions, were allowed to retain four players.What’s the condition regarding overseas players? A team is allowed to play only four overseas players in a match. Besides, four players must belong to the catchment area where the team is located.What is the maximum pool of players a franchise can have? Each franchise can have a maximum squad of 30 players. They must have 4 under-21 players in the pool.Who is the master auctioneer? Richard Madley, a professional auctioneer from England, is accepting the bids from all the franchisees as he did for the last 3 editions.last_img read more

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XXX energy for SRK’s IPL team!

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Sardar Singh keen to do well at London Olympics

first_imgHe is the one Indian player who can easily get into any international All-Stars team, and Sardar Singh will have added responsibility when the eight-time hockey gold medallists India start their campaign at the London Olympics.Part of the team which suffered heartbreak in Chile four years ago, Sardar will be all the more determined to make a big impression at his first Olympics.”The past is gone. We cannot change it. It was one bad day in Chile which cost us an Olympic berth.”But we have prepared well and playing as a team. Our performances have improved and the team atmosphere is very good,” Sardar told Mail Today. “Recent results show that we are on the right track.”Being one of the more experienced and accomplished players in the squad, Sardar is looked up to by several of his teammates, such as newcomer SK Uthappa.”There will be pressure at the Olympics. It will be up to seniors like me to guide the youngsters. At big tournaments, there is a lot of noise during matches and communication with teammates becomes very important,” the midfielder from Sant Nagar village of Haryana’s Sirsa district said.After being part of the FIH All-Stars team for two consecutive years, Sardar will be a marked man at the Olympics, with opposition teams wary of giving him room to operate as he is the engine that drives the Indian team. But he is not fazed.”I know that opposition teams will target me and will try to restrict my movement, and for that I am prepared. That is why every day after practice I put in an extra hour for my own preparation,” he said. “I am ready for the challenge.”advertisementUnder chief coach Michael Nobbs and exercise physiologist David John, the Indian players have endeavoured to match the world’s best in all areas, including fitness and endurance. Sardar is the best example of the new-look Indian side with his sculptured body and seemingly boundless stamina.Sardar is also one of the most versatile players around and has possibly played in every position except the goalkeeper, and performed admirably everywhere though he excels as the pivot of the team in the centrehalf position.Sardar, who will turn 26 before the Olympics begin, is a circleto-circle player who can create chances as well as nip the opposition moves before they become threatening.He would be the key to India’s chances but the blue turf at the Riverbank Arena will be a new feature. Sardar, however, does not believe it will pose much of a problem.”We have not had too much time on that surface, but it should not make much of a difference. We will also play with yellow Kookaburra balls and have adapted well to them. We have also played and trained at the Olympic venue during the test event.Nobbs has gone on record saying that if India, ranked 10th in the world, can finish in the top six, it will be a creditable achievement.Sardar, however, has higher ambitions. “We will give our best at the Olympics. Our first target is the semi-finals but we are ultimately aiming at a podium finish,” he said. He will need to be at his best to realise that ambition.last_img read more

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Anirban Lahiri scores first hole-in-one in British Open golf

first_imgAnirban Lahiri extended his dream debut by producing the first hole-in-one of the 141st Open Championships and then proceeded to card a very mature and steady round of 70 that kept him at even-par for three rounds at Royal Lytham and St Annes on Saturday.While Lahiri, 25, was celebrating his ace and a good round on a day when scoring was once again tough, his senior colleague Jeev Milkha Singh, was “left licking his wounds” in his own words as he struggled to a round of sixover 76 that had three birdies but seven bogeys and a double bogey.Lahiri in contrast had three bogeys, all were results of going into bunkers from where he had to sit sideways and take the bitter pill in the form of bogeys. He also had a birdie and an ace on eighth and ninth respectively.While Lahiri was tied 20th with some players still on the course, Jeev had slipped to 76th.Meanwhile, Adam Scott made the big move midway through his round. He had made two birdies and moved to 11-under, while overnight leader Brandt Snedeker, who had never made the cut at British Open before this year had dropped from 10-under to sevenunder, and Tiger Woods had joined in second place after 10 holes.When asked about the day, Lahiri admitted, “Yeah, just when I thought that it was fantastic, it gets even better. Like I said right from the start I’ve been saying it since Thursday, Friday, today, Saturday, it’s just been fantastic. That’s (hole in one) probably the icing on the cake today.”advertisementIn contrast, Jeev was rather disappointed and candidly said, “It was a great day, sunny and absolutely perfect and I was looking forward to it. So, I am very disappointed with the way I played. The conditions were perfect for low scoring. I need to make a move tomorrow. I struggled with every part of my game and I hit some loose shots and did not play the bunkers well. I am licking my wounds right now.”Lahiri, playing with Ted Potter, last week’s winner on the PGA Tour, opened with a pair of pars, but then found the first of many bunkers during the day. On both the third and the fourth, he had to hit out sideways to find his way back to the fairway and take bogeys. “I did get a little anxious but then steadied to three pars, before a birdie came my way on eighth,” said Lahiri.Then came the amazing holein-one, which suddenly brought him from two-over to one-under. He said, “You’re just looking around, you don’t know how to express yourself, and then you see your dad jumping up out there blowing you kisses. These moments don’t come every day. The ball is with my dad. I don’t think anybody can take that away from him.”On his finish and final score, Lahiri felt he could have gone lower. “I am happy where I am but it’s also a bit disappointing when you’re one under at the turn. I played well right through the back nine. I think I hit almost all the greens apart from two – the 18 and 15, I think. But I’ll take it. I’ll still take it. It puts me in a good position,” added Lahiri.How he aced the holeAnirban Lahiri said: “I was two over coming up to the eighth hole and walked up the tee, it was almost exactly the same yardage as yesterday. And I was in between clubs again. Yesterday I hit the wedge instead of a 9 iron, and found a greenside trap and made bogey. I just told my caddie, we’ll take the 9, it doesn’t matter if it goes past, I’ll just hit it soft. Made a good swing on it. It was looking a little right of the hole, but it got a really, really friendly bounce. I was just hoping it ended up close. When it goes in, everybody goes wild, I go wild, it was fantastic.”last_img read more

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London Olympic heroes in a glittering ceremony at Prez House

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Retired boxer Mike Tyson reveals his starry ambitions

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Army Intelligence grapples with doping in recruitment rally in Alwar

first_imgThe Military Intelligence (MI) recovered large number of drugs at the ongoing recruitment rally at Alwar on Sunday but failed to act as the “army has no procedure or expertise to check doping”.    To make situation worse the National Anti-Doping Agency (NADA) refused to interfere saying that the recruitment in the army was not under their jurisdiction.Despite the fact that the candidates at the recruitment rallies were resorting to doping and also submitting forged documents at the recruitment rally in Alwar, the officers tried to underplay the irregularities and cited ill-equipment as the primary reason. Defence PRO Colonel SD Goswami confirmed that the MI recovered drugs including antibiotics, whiteners, cough syrups that contained alcohol contents, vitamin capsules and drugs that gave kick near the Indira Gandhi stadium boundary walls where the rally was being conducted since October 3. The rally, being organised by the army headquarters, would continue till October 13.   The army officers immediately informed the local police and the anti-doping agency for action. However, the candidates who had used them couldn’t be tracked. Even as a frisking was done on several candidates, nothing much was recovered. In view of the large number of candidates – around 7000 – the army didn’t find it possible to even frisk the candidates to check doping.Army’s additional director general (recruitment) Major General Kanwaljit Singh who visited Alwar’s recruitment rally on Monday said the NADA contacted by the recruitment officers too expressed its inability to extend a helping hand in the matter as it was not a sporting event. “Though initially NADA authorities agreed to the army’s request for a random check for doping they went back on their assurance saying that army recruitment was beyond their jurisdiction,” pointed out Singh.  Evidence suggested that drugs were also got injected by some aspirants, he revealed. It was not only the doping that remained unchecked. MI team recovered 50 bogus seals and 51 stamp- pads used in getting their documents attested by the aspirants. Goswami said that the army had registered an FIR with the local police for action into the bogus seals used in attesting the documents.Sources said that as the recruitment officers did not pursue the forgery incidents police found it convenient to hush them up. Alarmed by the development Brig. S.K. Sharma, deputy director, recruitment Zone (Rajasthan) rushed to Alwar on Monday. Significantly, of the entire recruitments from Rajasthan 40 per cent were from Alwar during the past three years, sources pointed out.advertisementlast_img read more

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90-year-old cycling champ fails doping test, loses crown

first_imgIn light of the other test, Grove lost only his results from the day of his positive test. /cbbSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? View comments SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting MOST READ Dream the impossible SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Carl Grove, a 90-year-old American cyclist, has been stripped of his age-group title and world record from the US Masters Track Championships after failing a doping test due to a food supplement he was taking. AFPCarl Grove, a 90-year-old American cyclist, has been stripped of his age-group title and world record from the US Masters Track Championships after failing a doping test.The US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) issued a public warning Friday to Grove for a violation they said likely came from consuming meat contaminated with a banned substance.ADVERTISEMENT Grove had won the 90-94 age group individual pursuit crown in a world record 3mins 6.129secs last July 11 at Breinigsville, Pennsylvania. He was the lone competitor in his age group.The resident of the small town of Bristol, Indiana, about 120 miles east of Chicago, tested positive for epitrenbolone, a metabolite of the prohibited substance trenbolone in a urine sample taken after his run.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionGrove provided USADA with information the doping watchdogs said led them to find that “the source of his positive test was more likely than not caused by contaminated meat consumed the evening before competing.”Grove had passed a doping test after competing the day before even though USADA later found a supplement he was using before the competition date had the presence of the banned substance clomiphene, although it was not listed in the ingredients. LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games openinglast_img read more

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Azkals draw strength from Filipinos in UAE

first_imgJavier Patiño started as the lone striker for the Azkals against the Koreans, creating a couple of chances, which the Filipino-Spanish player also missed.And with the Azkals holding their own against the Koreans for most of the match, Patiño could be leading the line once more against the Chinese side.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“I’m happy to have made an appearance in the Asian Cup, but I’m disappointed not to have played a bigger role,” said Younghusband. “There’s still two games to go so hopefully I get more game time.”Azkals coach Sven-Goran Eriksson praised Younghusband’s response in his role as a substitute. ABU DHABI—Limited to a cameo in the AFC Asian Cup opener against South Korea, Philippines skipper Phil Younghusband hopes to play a bigger role as the Azkals attempt to reach the next round in the continent’s biggest football tournament.The country’s top international scorer made his Asian Cup debut when he came on as an 88th minute substitute to Patrick Strauss on Monday night at Al Maktoum Stadium in Dubai.ADVERTISEMENT “He is not only a good human being, a good football player, but also a very good professional,” said Eriksson, who has handled the likes of high profile players like David Beckham when he coached England.“He never showed bad things. He accepted his role. He came on, you can see he is very professional. What he has done for the Philippines is great. More than 100 games, 52 goals which is amazing it is always important to remember that.”The Azkals were playing the Chinese on Friday night at Mohammed Bin Zayed Stadium, with a win or a draw keeping them in the hunt for a place in the Round of 16. Kyrgyzstan will be the Azkals’ last Group C assignment on Wednesday.With almost 700,000 Filipinos in the United Arab Emirates, the Azkals said they’re dedicating their performances to their countrymen here.“All we can do is to come out and not to have regrets,” said Patrick Reichelt. “It’s amazing seeing that although it’s far from home, we do have so much support. Its incredible and it helps us a lot.”ADVERTISEMENT View comments Ababa tries to keep streak going Azkals manager Dan Palami said the team was taking inspiration from the country’s overseas Filipino workers (OFWs).“If the team is battling it out on the pitch, our OFWs here also have their own battles here every day missing their families, that’s why we’re dedicating our games to them,” said Palami.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krausscenter_img Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting LATEST STORIES SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion SEA Games hosting troubles anger Dutertelast_img read more

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1 point away, Serena Williams stunned by Karolina Pliskova at Australian Open

first_imgSEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants View comments “I was almost in the locker room,” Pliskova told the Rod Laver Arena crowd, “but now I’m standing here as the winner.”In the semifinals, Pliskova will face No. 4-seeded Naomi Osaka, who advanced by beating No. 6 Elina Svitolina 6-4, 6-1 earlier Wednesday. The other women’s semifinal will be two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova against unseeded American Danielle Collins.In the men’s quarterfinals Wednesday, 2016 Wimbledon runner-up Milos Raonic met No. 28 Lucas Pouille, before 14-time major champion Novak Djokovic was scheduled to face 2014 U.S. Open finalist Kei Nishikori at night.Williams’ surprising departure scuttled what would have been a much-anticipated rematch against Osaka, who beat her in the chaotic U.S. Open final last September.This defeat is the earliest in Australia for Williams since way back in 2014, when she exited with a fourth-round loss to Ana Ivanovic. Since then? She won the tournament in 2015, lost in the final in 2016, and won again in 2017 while pregnant, before missing last year’s edition a few months after the birth of her daughter.ADVERTISEMENT As for chasing Margaret Court’s all-time mark of 24 Slam trophies in singles, Williams said: “It hasn’t happened yet, but I feel like it’s going to happen.”The match against Pliskova was played under a stifling sun, with the temperature around 80 degrees (25 Celsius). Williams — coming off an intense three-set victory over No. 1 Simona Halep in the fourth round — often stepped into the patches of shade behind each baseline.She did not start well, not well at all. Her mistakes were mounting and deficit was growing.In the first set alone, Williams made more than twice as many unforced errors as her opponent, 11-5, a pattern that would continue throughout. By the end, the margin was 37-15.Looking increasingly frustrated, Williams would yell at herself after mistakes or gesture as if to say, “That’s NOT how I should be hitting the ball!” Add it all up, and Pliskova led by a set and a break at 3-2 in the second.Only then did Williams get going. From there, she immediately earned her first break point of the match and converted it to get to 3-all, beginning a run in which she claimed nine of 11 games.“You don’t really feel,” Pliskova said, “like you’re going to win this match.”Serving for the victory at 5-1, 40-30, Williams was called for a foot fault — reminiscent of an infamous such ruling at the U.S. Open a decade ago. During the ensuing point Wednesday, Williams twisted her left ankle and dumped a forehand into the net.She grabbed at her foot afterward, then double-faulted and would go on to cede that game.Not a big deal, right? She still had a sizable lead. ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations And so it was that a startling reversal and result would follow Wednesday at Melbourne, with Williams dropping the last six games of a 6-4, 4-6, 7-5 loss to No. 7 seed Karolina Pliskova of the Czech Republic.“I can’t say that I choked on those match points,” Williams said. “She literally played her best tennis ever on those shots.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsThe 37-year-old American didn’t call for a trainer during the match and later wouldn’t blame the ankle for the way everything changed down the stretch, saying afterward that it “seems to be fine.”But instead of Williams moving closer to an eighth championship at the Australian Open and record-tying 24th Grand Slam title overall, it is Pliskova who will continue the pursuit of her first major trophy. Except that three more match points would follow while Pliskova served, and she saved each one.“There’s nothing I did wrong on those match points. I didn’t do anything wrong. I stayed aggressive,” Williams said. “She just literally hit the lines on some of them.”Williams would again serve for the match at 5-3 — and again get broken. The owner of the most feared and respected serve in women’s tennis was broken for a third time in a row at 5-all, and Pliskova was on her way.“She got a little bit shaky in the end,” Pliskova said. “So I took my chances. And I won.”Osaka will carry a 12-match Grand Slam winning streak into the semifinals.The 21-year-old from Japan moved closer to a second consecutive major championship by parlaying her aggressive and powerful style into a 31-11 edge in winners against Svitolina.“For me, right now, I just try to keep looking forward. So I’m not really satisfied. Like, I am happy that I’m here, but at the same time, I want to keep going,” said Osaka, who never had been past the fourth round at the Australian Open. “There is more matches to win.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next United States’ Serena Williams grabs at her ankle during her quarterfinal loss to Karolina Pliskova of the Czech Republic at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)MELBOURNE, Australia — Four times, Serena Williams was only one point — a single point — from closing out a victory in the Australian Open quarterfinals.On the first such chance, at 5-1, 40-30 in the third set, she turned her left ankle awkwardly. The owner of the best serve in the sport would lose every point she served the rest of the way.ADVERTISEMENT Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting LATEST STORIES Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Mavericks’ Luka Doncic fined $10,000 for kicking ball into stands MOST READlast_img read more

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