Category: boorpt

Conviction Bourbon Released from a Former Prison Turned Whiskey Distillery

first_img The Best Whiskey for Whipping Up a Whiskey Sour All the New Whiskies You Need to Drink This Fall The Manual Spirit Awards 2019: The Best Craft Liquor Made in America 5 of the Best Aged Tequilas to Drink When the Weather Cools Down Editors’ Recommendations The first time we wrote about Southern Grace Distilleries — the prison distillery located just outside of Charlotte, North Carolina — the space was only getting set to open. At the time, they had their white whiskey, and that was about it. Flash ahead to now (about a year later) and Southern Grace has launched their first aged whiskey: Conviction Bourbon.Conviction Bourbon is aged in a mix of 10- and 15-gallon barrels for around eight months in the only rackhouse in North Carolina  — not to mention the only rackhouse that used to be part of a prison. As the distillery begins producing more stock, Southern Grace is slowly transitioning away from the smaller batches to full-size, 53-gallon barrels.The first release of the bourbon features a few different blends. Because of barrel size, the bottles have been drawn and co-mingled from a number of different barrels (usually two or three for each batch), all of which are noted on the bottle.Appearance: Conviction Bourbon is a golden amber color.Nose: On the front, notes of brown sugar and cinnamon. These are followed by oak and cinnamon. The nose of reminiscent of the children’s breakfast cereal Waffle Crisp.Palate: Conviction has a fairly light body, with burnt caramel, oak, and candied fruit revealing themselves immediately. Honeyed cherries and toasted oak come through next, followed by hints of dark chocolate and vanilla.Finish: Smooth brown sugar close the palate out, which is also when the heat shows up. The long finish lingers, with dry oak staying on the tongue to the end.Final Thoughts:  For a young bourbon — and a first aged release from a distillery — it may surprise you how good it is (especially when so many craft bourbons out there are released before they are ready). While eight months may not seem like a long time, the smaller barrels help speed the process up a little bit, delivering a whiskey that is mature beyond its time. It’ll be interesting to see future releases that have been stored in full-size barrels and to see how the team at Southern Grace manages the transition. If this bourbon is any indication, then there are good things on the horizon.Conviction Bourbon is 48.2 percent ABV and retails for around $35. Southern Grace is now up and operational, and quite fun to tour if you’re in the area. The Best New-School Kentucky Distillerieslast_img read more

MakeAWish To Celebrate Disneys 100000th Global Wish

first_imgIt all started with the first wish in 1981, a wish by an 8-year-old boy named Frank “Bopsy” Salazar, who wished to be transported into the magical world of inspiration and motivation at Disney.Thirty-four years later, Make-A-Wish Foundation and Disney will grant their 100,000th global wish together. Since Bopsy’s wish, Disney has given wish kids with life-threatening medical conditions incredible memories that can provide the hope, strength, and joy they need to fight their illness. This February, Make-A-Wish is celebrating all Disney has done to strengthen the families and communities where we all live, work and play.Make-A-Wish America grants more than 14,000 wishes each year. More than 7,000 of them involve Disney’s help – ranging from once-in-a-life time meetings with favorite Disney talent and visits to Disney theme parks, to extraordinary trips on Disney Cruise Lines and relaxing stays at the Aulani, a Disney Resort & Spa in Hawaii. In 2014, Disney contributed more than $14.5 million through the donation of cash and theme park tickets to help grant these wishes.“Since the very first wish, Disney has provided our wish kids with imaginative experiences and lasting memories, the type only Disney can provide,” said David Williams, president and CEO of Make-A-Wish America. “Nearly 35 years and 100,000 wishes later, Disney’s steadfast support of our mission continues to grow as they help us all to believe that anything is possible. We are grateful to have such a dedicated and faithful friend.”Disney’s support of Make-A-Wish extends far beyond the wish experience. In 2012, Make-A-Wish, as a signature partner, secured a grant from Disney, and every year since has received grants to help build wish infrastructure and other capacity-building programs. Disney-owned ESPN has showcased incredible sports-related wish stories on their annual “My Wish” series, this summer marks the series’ 10th anniversary; and the company encourages Disney VoluntEARS to contribute their time and talents to further the Make-A-Wish mission. The timeless bonds and memories Disney has created have helped kids through treatments, helped them overcome doubts and despair, and helped them feel and get better – because wishes work wonders.Throughout the month of February, Make-A-Wish will showcase Disney wish stories on its website at wish.org, sharing the story of just a few of the thousands of wish kids impacted by their Disney experience. Make-A-Wish is proud to call Disney its longest tenured sponsor and sincerely thanks Disney for more than three decades of generous support through granting 100,000 wishes – and counting – since that first wish in 1981.last_img read more

We are industry for the medical system we are industry for the

first_imgAPTN National NewsFor the record here is Betsy Bruyere the creator of the Facebook page ‘Critical Analysis of Racial Thoughts’.APTN’s Shirley Mclean interviewed hear at the start of the TRC hearings in Vancouver.last_img

BC First Nations clash with commercial fishing boat caught on camera

first_imgAPTN National NewsA clash between First Nations and a commercial fishing boat was recently caught on camera along the northwest central coast of British Columbia.The battle was over the provincial government’s decision to open up the herring fishery.It’s something First Nations people say will further deplete an already failing fishing stocks.APTN’s Tina House has the story.last_img

Suspect in Cleveland Facebook killing shoots himself after police chase

The man who was suspected of killing an Ohio man and posting the video on Facebook is dead, according to police.Pennsylvania State Police tweeted that Steve Stephens was spotted Tuesday morning by officers in Erie County. Officials say police attempted to pull him over and after a brief pursuit, Stephens shot and killed himself. Stephens was wanted by Cleveland police on an aggravated murder charge in the death of a 74-year-old retired man in Cleveland on Sunday.Steve Stephens was spotted this morning by PSP members in Erie County. After a brief pursuit, Stephens shot and killed himself.— PA State Police (@PAStatePolice) April 18, 2017 read more

In Guinea as Ebola spread slows Ban pledges UN support towards total

“Thanks to the determination of national authorities, the mobilization of affected populations and with partners around the world, the spread of the virus has been significantly slowed in some regions of the country,” said Mr. Ban during a press conference in Conakry alongside Guinean President Alpha Condé.“However, much remains to be done. Ebola continues to spread and is a serious risk for all Guineans. The UN Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER) and our partners are here to help you. It has never been more important to work together,” said the Secretary-General.Following “very successful” discussions with President Condé on the country’s Ebola response, the UN chief said he had delivered a personal message to the people of Guinea: “The United Nations will support you until the epidemic is halted and the country to recover from its devastating effects.” The Secretary-has been in West Africa since Thursday, on a mission of solidarity to show support for the people and governments on the front lines battling the world’s worst-ever outbreak of Ebola.After a stop at UNMEER’s home base in Accra, Ghana, Mr. Ban visited Liberia and Sierra Leone yesterday. Later today, he heads to Mali. He is being accompanied by the head of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr. Margaret Chan, as well as his Special Envoy for Ebola, Dr. David Nabarro, and the head of UNMEER, Anthony Banbury.Along the way, Mr. Ban has expressed cautious optimism that Ebola can be beat in West Africa. In respective meetings with Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and President Ernest Bai Koroma of Sierra Leone, he stressed that the approach against Ebola is adapting to the shifting evolution of the outbreak as it becomes more geographically dispersed.The Secretary General’s visit and call for continued vigilance comes as the WHO reports in its latest regional statistics on the outbreak that Ebola is affecting some 19,031 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and has killed 7,373.In his remarks in Conakry, the Secretary-General said that progress against Ebola has given hope to defeat the disease to thousands of people – doctors, care givers and people affected by the virus – especially those fighting for their lives.“All Guineans – government officials, community leaders, traditional healers and local communities – will be actively involved in the fight against the disease to end the epidemic,” said Mr. Ban, noting that he had spoken with President Condé about the situation in Forest Guinea, where there has been a “worrying” increase in the number of patients.The two leaders also agreed that it was strong cross-border cooperation is need, particularly in the framework of the Mano River Union, to keep the virus from spreading or from bouncing back in areas where the number of transmissions had decreased.Thanking President Condé for his Government’s efforts, the Secretary-General said that he had just met with dedicated health care workers in the country and expressed his “deep admiration…for those on the frontline, the thousands of men and women from Guinea and other countries of the world who are struggling to save lives.” P>Further, Mr. Ban said in the long term, the Ebola outbreak may have serious socio-economic consequences. “While our immediate priority is to stop the spread of the disease, it is not too early to start thinking about recovery,” he underscored, echoing a call he has made at every stop in the region, to boost efforts to restore basic social services, strengthen health services, support the economy and increase resilience in the affected countries. Wrapping up his comments, the Secretary General emphasized that the countries of Africa and the world have mounted and “extraordinary” response to tackle the Ebola outbreak. “I invite the international community to remain mobilized. Our common goal is to eradicate the disease completely,” he declared, pledging that he and the United Nations family are committed to doing everything possible to help Guinea. Flying on to Mali later in the day, Mr. Ban met in Bamako with President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta. According to a read-out the meting from the Office of his spokesperson, the Secretary-General expressed his appreciation for the swift and determined reaction by Malian authorities to imported cases of Ebola. Further to the read-out, Mr. Ban and President Keïta agreed on the importance of remaining vigilant to the ongoing threat of Ebola in the region and of continuing to strengthen national systems’ preparedness. In addition, the Secretary-Genera reiterated his call for positive engagement by President Keïta and his Government in the Inter-Malian dialogue. He stressed that sustainable peace in Mali is the only way to achieve sustainable development, said the read-out. read more

Coffey Mining – Brazilian mineral exploration on the up

first_imgCoffey Mining’s Global Business Development Manager, David Atchison, thinks continued growth in the Chinese economy is driving mineral exploration in countries such as Brazil. “Chinese mining companies are looking to secure future supplies of resources and this is resulting in unprecedented levels of outbound investment in major global mining markets such as Brazil.” The consultancy discussed this at the recent Brazilian Symposium of Mineral Exploration (SIMEXMIN), from May 23-26 in Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais.The event, promoted by the Agency for the Technological Development of the Brazilian Mineral Industry, brings together domestic and international exploration communities to discuss the challenges and advances experienced in the Brazillian sector and abroad over recent years. Discussions cover political, economic, legal, technological, environmental and financial matters.Atchinson continued: “Also, uncertainty in the global economy, namely debt concerns in European countries, has resulted in historically high gold prices, which is providing investment opportunities for companies exploring the commodity in South America.”Mario Reinhardt, Operations and Business Development Director for Coffey Mining in Brazil, said the development of the different phases of mineral exploration in Brazil was still facing some challenges. However, he commended the current efforts the country has in place to offer an increasing volume of quality public data to assist in minimising the risk involved in mineral surveying and increase local investments.“I believe that broader availability of airborne geophysical data, geological data and images, detailed mapping and updates of the large metallogenetic context at a lower cost, or even free, would reduce the risks of mineral surveying. As a consequence, further investments would be attracted, delivering positive results and greater return for the community and the country.“An update of the minimum requirements of the Brazilian standards for surveying and mineral resources and the utilisation of international best practices could stimulate an increasing professionalism of the sector,” he added.Despite the challenges, Reinhardt said the consultancy was observing a strong recovery in the market, with new mining projects in Brazil and South America underway and a large number of international investors interested in these projects.“Currently, Coffey Mining’s Brazilian team is working on 25 exploration projects in Brazil and overseas. These projects are in different stages, ranging from grassroots through to resource estimation, and our activities include regional studies, remote sensing targeting, geophysics and multi-criteria analysis, target follow up and detailing and resource estimations,” he explained.Coffey Mining has 50 years’ experience in the global mining industry, more than 15 years’ experience in Brazil and is a specialist accredited in all mining jurisdictions globally.last_img read more

Tatran celebrate Slovakian title – Vlado Bozic is new goalkeeper

← Previous Story NEW LEADER IN FRANCE: Chambery put trophy in the PSG hands? Next Story → SWISS FINAL 2015: Kadetten smash St. Otmar at the start! HC Tatran Prešov are new old Slovakian champions. Nothing new has happened in the Play-Off Final, in which SEHA GAZPROM league member had no problem to beat Sporta Hlohovec with 3:0 in series. Tatran had the chance to celebrate new trophy in front of the home fans after victory 33:25.This isn’t the only news from Prešov. The Serbian goalkeeper Svetislav Verkic left the club after four years. On his place is coming Croatian goalie Vlado Bozic, who is currently member of the Austrian Bregenz, the Play-Off finalist.The 31 years-old Bozic has experience from ASOBAL (Teucro, Quenca), DKB Bundesliga (Friesenheim), SEHA (Meshkov Brest), Poland (Gwardia Opole) and Qatar (Al Rayyan). read more

Inondations et glissements de terrain font 21 victimes en Thaïlande

first_imgInondations et glissements de terrain font 21 victimes en ThaïlandeDes pluies diluviennes s’abattent depuis une semaine sur le sud de la Thaïlande, engendrant de dévastatrices et meurtrières inondations et coulées de boue. 15 victimes seraient à déplorer d’après un dernier bilan, tandis qu’un million de personnes seraient sinistrées.Alors que dans la province de Krabi, dix à vingt personnes ont disparu depuis un glissement de terrain survenu mardi soir, plusieurs villages de la région sont ce mercredi coupées du monde. Un dernier bilan ferait, d’après Romandie, état de 21 morts depuis le début des inondations. “Il y a environ un million de personnes touchées dans plusieurs provinces. Au début, nous avons pensé que les inondations dureraient un jour ou deux, mais ça fait déjà une semaine”, a indiqué le vice-Premier ministre Suthep Thaugsuban.À lire aussiInondations meurtrières dans l’Aude : ce qu’il faut savoirCoupures d’électricité, fermeture de nombreuses routes, de lignes ferroviaires et de liaisons aériennes : les inondations et glissements de terrains paralysent une partie de la Thaïlande en cette période censée être l’une des plus chaudes et sèches de l’année dans le pays. Ces intempéries touchent en outre des milliers de voyageurs aujourd’hui bloqués sur des sites touristiques. Sur la seule île de Koh Samui, 13.000 touristes seraient dans l’incapacité de rentrer chez eux, a affirmé Bannasat Ruangjan, le président de l’office du tourisme de cette île. Des centaines d’autres touristes sont également coincés sur les îles de Koh Tao et Phangan, dans le golfe de Thaïlande, et sur celles de Similan et Surin, dans la mer d’Andaman. La marine thaïlandaise a envoyé plusieurs navires et hélicoptères afin d’apporter des vivres et secourir les personnes bloquées. A ce jour, quelque 80 districts du sud de la Thaïlande ont été déclarés en zone de catastrophe naturelle. Alors que la pluie devrait encore s’abattre pendant deux jours sur la région, les dégâts sont aujourd’hui estimés à 10 millions de bahts, soit 230.000 euros environ.Le 30 mars 2011 à 17:11 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Police say 3 dead after shooting at Maryland mall

first_imgCOLUMBIA, Md. — A man carrying a shotgun opened fire at a busy shopping mall in suburban Baltimore on Saturday, sending store employees and customers scrambling for cover. Police said three people died, including the person believed to be the shooter. Five people were injured.Police were still trying to determine the identity and motive of the gunman who killed a man and a woman, both in their 20s, at a skate shop called Zumiez on the upper level of the Mall in Columbia, a suburb of both Baltimore and Washington. Their identities were not released.Howard County Police Chief William J. McMahon said at a news conference that authorities ran into difficulty in identifying the gunman because of concerns that he might be carrying explosives and were proceeding with an “abundance of caution.”McMahon also called reports that the killings were “domestic” in origin “pure speculation.”“We do not know yet what caused the shooting incident,” he said. “We do not have a motive.”Someone called 911 at around 11:15 a.m. to report a shooting at the mall. Police responded to the scene within 2 minutes and found three people dead — including one person who was found near a gun and ammunition — either inside or outside the shop, which sells skateboards and clothing and accessories.Howard County General Hospital said it was treating five patients. One patient was reported to be a shooting victim while at least three other patients sustained other injuries.last_img read more

The Man who Investigated Chernobyl – The Sad Fate of Valery Legasov

first_imgThe case of Chernobyl chief investigator Valery Legasov is to this day mysterious and unsettling. Although the horrifying 1986 nuclear plant explosion at Chernobyl has never disappeared from the news cycle, the rave reviews that the 2019 HBO miniseries Chernobyl is garnering bring the disaster firmly to the fore. Winning particular attention in the miniseries is the role of Soviet scientist Valery Legasov, portrayed by Jared Harris. Valery Legasov was an inorganic chemist specializing in noble gases and became a key member of the Soviet government’s investigation into the Chernobyl disaster less than 24 hours after it occurred.  While some officials tried to minimize the explosion’s effect and cover up the causes, Legasov called for honesty and pushed for the evacuation of the town of Pripyat, also saying action must be taken to save lives across Europe in case of a secondary, even more damaging explosion.Jared Harris as Valery Legasov in the HBO miniseries Chernobyl. Photo courtesy of HBOHe had been the deputy director of the I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy and a member of the Presidium of the Soviet Academy of Sciences.AdChoices广告inRead invented by TeadsOn April 26, 1986, Reactor Four at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Soviet Ukraine exploded, and fire from the explosion raged for 10 days, releasing tons of radioactive nuclear particles into the open air. More than 30 people succumbed within days of acute radiation, among them the local firefighters who raced to the plant without any idea of the lethal risks. It is estimated about 4,000 people died later of related cancers, and experts say the surrounding area won’t be fit for human habitation for 20,000 years.Pripyat, ChernobylThe miniseries begins in 1988, two years after the explosion, with a furtive Legasov making audio tapes before taking his own life at 51 years of age. The narrative then heads back to 1986, and the fateful control room of the Chernobyl plant, where the reckless actions of one man in particular, deputy chief engineer Anatoly Dyatlov, led to disaster.Related Video:In one of the most effective scenes, Jared Harris says just after arriving at the scene, “You are dealing with something that has never happened on this planet before.”Jared Harris as Valery Legasov in the HBO miniseries Chernobyl. Photo courtesy of HBOIn 1986, four months after the explosion, Legasov participated in a 5-hour hearing on what caused the accident at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. Legasov acknowledged human error as well as faulty design of the reactor, writing in his report, “Neglect by the scientific management and the designers was everywhere with no attention being paid to the condition of instruments or of equipment.”He was applauded in the international community for his frank explanations and commitment to the investigation. His bravery was noted as well, as he was one of the only members of the team to not leave the site until the situation was contained, whereas other members rotated in and out of Chernobyl to avoid contamination. However, back home he was rather coldly received as the authorities didn’t want to bring any more attention to the matter and wanted to downplay the effects and causes of the meltdown.Chernobyl radiation mapLegasov hanged himself two years and one day after the explosion, leaving no note behind stating the cause for his final act of despair. There is speculation that he was deeply traumatized by his experience, and disillusioned with the Soviet government. Intense pressure on the Soviet nuclear plants to perform in the 1980s led to unsafe risks, some say. Reportedly, Legasov said that Chernobyl was the “apotheosis of all that was wrong in the management of the national economy and had been so for many decades.”Some believe that it was what he learned about his government’s role in the catastrophe that led to his hopelessness. Legasov had detailed how there was no infrastructure or organization within the Soviet Union that had the capability to deal with the mammoth effects of the Chernobyl situation.Vladimir Gubarev, a close friend of Legasov who wrote a popular play based on Chernobyl, stated in the Soviet newspaper Pravda that Legasov was ridiculed by his colleagues for how he handled the investigation despite the international praise he received for it. He subsequently lost a seat on the scientific and technical council of the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, where he had previously served as deputy director. This was a devastating blow and many speculate also played a large part in his sad fate.Legasov left behind many journals and allegedly audio tapes in his final days. However much of this is still being sifted through and called into question.Jared Harris, while preparing to portray Legasov, told The Cheat Sheet that he didn’t listen to any audio tapes to prepare for the role, but not because he did not want to. “There weren’t audio tapes,” Harris said. “He left behind journals. But that’s not as cinematic as audio tapes.”Harris continued, “They’re very hard to get a hold of. In fact, there’s not a lot of him left in the historical record because they basically wrote him out of the story. They erased him from history. That’s what they were trying to do as a threat.” The actor said this was “to stop him from trying to get the story out.”Related Article: 30 Years Ago, Three Men At Chernobyl Saved Millions of LivesIn an interview with the Los Angeles Times, Harris said the director of Chernobyl wanted to recover some of these names from history that have been forgotten and give them an appropriate place and have their sacrifice be remembered.”Correction: In a previous version of this article we wrongly stated that Legasov was a nuclear physicist. He was in fact an inorganic chemist. The correction was made on 7/9/2019.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

Two injured as bakkie rolls on the Bergville Road

first_imgPolice, RTI, Okhahlamba Protection Services, Okhahlamba Fire and Emergency, Okhahlamba Disaster Management Volunteers, emergency personnel and a towing service responded to the scene.Traffic flow was obstructed in the area while clean up operations were conducted.Click to receive news links via WhatsApp. Or  for the latest news, visit our webpage or follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Join us there! A bakkie crash on the Bergville Road (R616) left two people injured on Wednesday morning.Details of the crash is unknown at this stage.It is believed that the driver of the bakkie travelling on the roadway lost control and the vehicle rolled.Two people were treated on the scene for moderate injuries before being taken to hospital.Also read: Breaking News: 9 dead in horror crash between taxi and bakkie outside LadysmithAlso read: Video Included: 7 dead in horror crash on the R74 just outside Bergville WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite last_img read more

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first_imgVideo Player is loading.Mahadevappa Mahesh discusses trends in medical physics at the 2019 AAPM meetingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 4.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Related Content Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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October 16, 2009 – Researchers utilizing computed tomography (CT) scans have found that patients with severe cases of the H1N1 virus are at risk for developing severe complications, including pulmonary emboli (PE), according to a study published online Oct. 14, 2009, in the American Journal of Roentgenology. In the study, Chest Radiographic and CT Findings in Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus (S-OIV) Infection, which was published online at www.ajronline.org on October 14, and will appear in the December issue of the AJR, researchers set out to review the chest radiographic and CT findings in patients with presumed/laboratory-confirmed novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection.The study, performed at the University of Michigan Health Service, included 66 patients diagnosed with the H1N1 flu. Two study groups were formed. Group one consisted of 14 patients who were severely ill and required Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission. Group two consisted of 52 patients who were not severely ill and did not require ICU admission.All 66 patients underwent chest X-rays for the detection of H1N1 abnormalities. Ten patients from the ICU group and five patients from the largely outpatient group, underwent CT scans. “Pulmonary Emboli were seen on CT in five of 14 ICU patients,” said Prachi P. Agarwal, M.D., lead author of the study.The researchers concluded that chest radiographs were normal in more than half of patients with S-OIV (H1N1) and progress to bilateral extensive air-space disease in severely ill patients, who are at a high risk for PE.Reference: Agarwal, Prachi P. Radiographic and CT Findings in Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus (S-OIV) Infection. AJR:193, December 2009 1. American Journal of Roentgenology. For more information: www.ajronline.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | October 16, 2009 CT Identifies Risk of Pulmonary Emboli in Patients with H1N1 Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more last_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 May 21, 2013 — Unavoidable damage caused to the heart and lungs by radiotherapy treatment of tumors in the chest region can be limited by the administration of an ACE inhibitor, a drug commonly used in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, a group of Dutch researchers have found. [1]Common cancers such as breast, esophagus, lung and Hodgkin’s lymphoma are frequently treated with radiotherapy, but the radiation dose that can be given safely is limited by the sensitivity of the health lung tissue that is also irradiated.The lung is a particularly complex and sensitive organ and strategies for protecting it from radiotherapy damage, apart from limiting the dose given and, therefore, the efficacy of the treatment, are few. Presenting the research to the 2nd Forum of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), Dr. Sonja Van der Veen, MSc, from the University Medical Centre, Groningen, The Netherlands, said that she had set out with colleagues to see whether the use of an ACE inhibitor could protect against early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT). Previous studies had shown that damage to blood vessels can play an important role in the development of RILT [2], so the researchers irradiated the lungs, heart or heart and lungs of rats and administered the ACE inhibiter captopril immediately after treatment. The rats’ lung functions were then measured at two-weekly intervals.”After eight weeks, when early lung toxicity is usually at its height, we found that captopril improved the rats’ heart and lung functions, but we were surprised to find that this only occurred when the heart was included in the irradiation field,” said Van der Veen. “This was not due to protection of the lung blood vessels, which were equally damaged with or without captopril. So we investigated further and found that the captopril treatment improved the heart’s function and decreased the level of fibrosis in the heart soon after irradiation. So these new findings show that ACE inhibition decreases RILT by reducing direct acute heart damage.”Irradiating the heart leads to the development of fibrosis, which stiffens it, and this in turn leads to problems in the relaxation of the left ventricle. Due to this, blood flow from the lungs into the heart is hindered, and this can cause pulmonary damage. However, after treatment with captopril, the researchers observed an improvement in ventricular relaxation in the irradiated hearts.Van der Veen and her colleagues are now collaborating with a research group from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., in order to design a randomized clinical trial where patients who are treated with radiation to the thoracic area including the heart will be treated with either an ACE inhibitor or a placebo after irradiation.Much progress has been made in radiation treatment over recent years, but in breast cancer, for example, most women still receive high doses to the heart, and this is known to increase the risk of heart disease. A recent study [3] has shown that for each Gray (Gy) [4] of radiation, there is a 7.4 percent increase in the occurrence of a subsequent major coronary event.”Given that most women will receive a dose of between 1 and 5 Gray, and that the dangers are even greater for women with existing cardiac risk factors or coronary disease, this is still a big problem,” said Van der Veen.Rats were chosen for the study because, unlike mice, they are big enough for researchers to be able to irradiate different part of the lungs and heart. The researchers believe that the way in which ACE inhibition works in both animals and humans is similar.”We are confident that our clinical trial will see the same protective effect in humans as that which we have seen in rats,” said Van der Veen. “We will also now begin to study the late effects of ACE inhibition on RILT to see whether it affords similar protection. We believe that our results suggest a promising strategy for shielding patients from radiation damage and improving their quality of life, while at the same time allowing them to receive a high enough dose to ensure the effective treatment of their cancer.”President of ESTRO, Professor Vincenzo Valentini, a radiation oncologist at the Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy, said: “This study underlines the importance of translational research. The understanding of anti-cancer mechanisms, as well as of protective opportunities discovered in the experimental environment, is of upmost importance in the era of personalized medicine. This research provides further evidence of the importance of testing experimental theories in the clinical environment to the ultimate benefit of patients.”References:[1] ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) Inhibitors are a class of drugs usually used for treating high blood pressure and heart failure.[2] Ghobadi G, Bartelds B, van der Veen SJ, Dickinson MG, Brandenburg S, Berger RM, et al. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension. Thorax 2012 Apr;67(4):334-341[3] Darby SC, Ewertz M, McGale P, Bennet AM, Blom-Goldman U, Bronnum D, et al. Risk of ischemic heart disease in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer. N Engl J Med 2013 Mar 14;368(11):987-998.[4] One Gray is the absorption of one joule of energy, in the form of ionizing radiation, per kilogram of matter. Abstract no: OC-0261, Proffered paper session/ Prevent 3: Cardiac Toxicity at 10.30 hrs (CEST) on Sunday 21 April, Room G Feature | May 21, 2013 Common Drug Can Limit Radiation Damage to Cancer Patient’s Heart, Lungs Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications Related Content Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 02, 2019 Varian Showcases Cancer Care Systems and Software at AAPM 2019 Varian showcased systems and software from its cancer care portfolio, including the Identify Guidance System, at the… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019 IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution… read more Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more last_img read more

Study Suggests Best Order of Treatment for Brain Metastases in EGFR Lung

first_img February 9, 2017 — A study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology found that radiation therapy followed by targeted medicines resulted in the longest overall survival for patients with EGFR mutant lung cancer and brain metastases.  About 10 percent of lung cancers in the United States and as many as 40 percent in Asia are driven by mutations in the EGFR gene. EGFR targeted treatment advances over the previous decade now result in multiple options for controlling the disease in the body, but due to the reduced ability of many of these drugs to penetrate into the brain, treating of disease in the brain remains challenging. When brain metastases are seen at diagnosis before a patient has tried EGFR-targeted drugs, it has been an open question whether doctors should try drugs alone just in case they work in the brain or move directly to whole-brain radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery (a tightly focused form of radiation) first, followed by targeted medicines.The study in question looks back at 351 patients with EGFR mutant lung cancer and brain metastases treated at six institutions to offer compelling preliminary evidence as to the best sequence of these techniques.”This particular study illustrates a remarkable finding and raises an interesting question. First of all, these patients all had tumors that had spread to the brain. Before we had these EGFR-directed medicines, their average survival would have been less than a year. But for patients treated with the newer medications, even if the cancer has spread to the brain, we are seeing survival ranging from 2-4 years on average, and that is a sign of fantastic progress for at least some lung cancer patients,” said Brian Kavanagh, M.D., MPH, FASTRO, professor and chair of radiation oncology at the University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center, and president of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).”Because these drugs do not penetrate into the brain very well, we still have to figure out what the best thing to do for tumors that have spread to that location. Do we just use the medicines alone and watch these patients carefully and react accordingly if they have a problem in the brain, or do we take action sooner rather than later and treat the tumors in the brain before they cause a problem? Our observations suggest that the second choice may be a better one for the drugs commonly used as first-line EGFR therapy to date,” said D. Ross Camidge, M.D., Ph.D., Joyce Zeff Chair in Lung Cancer Research at the CU Cancer Center and director of thoracic oncology at the CU School of Medicine.Specifically, the study evaluated patients in three groups. As above, those that received stereotactic radiosurgery and then an EGFR-directed drug had a median overall survival of 46 months. Those that received whole-brain radiotherapy followed by drug survived a median 30 months. And those that received drug first, followed by either of the radiation protocols as needed, survived a median 25 months.However, Camidge also added, “The study wasn’t randomized, though, so we can’t exclude other factors that might also have influenced the results. For example, radiosurgery may be used in those with a lesser burden of brain disease, whereas whole-brain radiation may be preferred in patients with more disease shortening their survival separately from the impact of the drug or radiation technique.”The study is a collaboration between Kavanagh and Camidge at CU Cancer Center and colleagues at the Yale, Vanderbilt, Memorial Sloan Kettering, Cleveland Clinic and UCSF cancer centers. While this retrospective analysis offers powerful initial evidence for the best use of these therapies, the team hopes that it will also inform a more definitive trial that could test these interventions prospectively.”Ulitmately, it is possible that there is some middle path that is best. We suspect that some patients with very tiny tumors in the brain, maybe ones that measure only 2-3 millimeters or so, can probably be safely watched closely for a while, and maybe we only need to treat them with radiosurgery when the tumors grow to a somewhat larger size,” Kavanagh said. “We are currently in discussions with our colleagues at the collaborating institutions who contributed to this paper to design a study that might answer that question to everyone’s satisfaction.”For more information: www.jco.orgReferencesMagnuson, W.J., Lester-Coll, N.H., Wu, A.J., Yang, J., et al. “Management of Brain Metastases in Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor–Naïve Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor–Mutant Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Analysis,” Journal of Clinical Oncology. Published online Jan. 23, 2017. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2016.69.7144 FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications News | Lung Cancer | February 09, 2017 Study Suggests Best Order of Treatment for Brain Metastases in EGFR Lung Cancer Results indicate stereotactic radiosurgery followed by EGFR-directed drugs yielded highest overall survival, but researchers caution more study needed Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Related Contentcenter_img News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more last_img read more

DeepMasterPrints master key fingerprints made by a neural network can now fake

first_imgNew York University researchers have found a way to generate artificial fingerprints that can be used to create fake fingerprints. They do this by using a neural network. They have presented their work in a paper titled DeepMasterPrints: Generating MasterPrints for Dictionary Attacks via Latent Variable Evolution. The vulnerability in fingerprint sensors Fingerprint recognition systems are vulnerable to dictionary attacks based on MasterPrint. MasterPrints are like master keys that can match with a large number of fingerprints. Such work was done previously at feature level, but now this work dubbed as DeepMasterPrints has much higher attack accuracy with the capacity to generate complete images. The method demonstrated in the paper is Latent Variable Evolution which is based on training a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) on a set of real fingerprint images. Then a stochastic search is then used to search for latent input variables to the generator network. This can increase the accuracy of impostor matches assessed by a fingerprint recognizer. Small fingerprint sensors pose a risk Aditi Roy, one of the authors of the paper exploited an observation. Smartphones have small areas for fingerprint recording and recognition. Hence the whole fingerprint is not recorded in them at once, they are partially recorded and authenticated. Also, some features among fingerprints are more common than others. She then demonstrated that MasterPrints can be obtained from real fingerprint images or be synthesized. With this exploit, 23% of the subjects could be spoofed in the used dataset at a 0.1% false match rate. The generated DeepMasterPrints was able to spoof 77% of the subjects at a 1% false match rate. This shows the danger of using small fingerprint sensors. For a DeepMasterPrint a synthetic fingerprint image needed to be created that can fool a fingerprint matcher. A condition was that the matcher should also match that fingerprint image to different identities in addition to realizing that the image is a fingerprint. The paper presents a method for creating DeepMasterPrint using a neural network that learns to generate fingerprint images. A Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES) is used for searching the input space of the trained neural network. The ideal fingerprint image is then selected. Conclusion Partial fingerprint images can be generated that can be used for launching dictionary attacks against a fingerprint verification system. A GAN network is trained over a dataset of fingerprints, then LVE searches the latent variables of the generator network for a fingerprint image that maximize the matching chance. This matching is only successful when a large number of different identities are involved, meaning specific individual attacks are not so likely. The use of inked images and sensor images show that the system is robust and independent of artifacts and datasets. For more details, read the research paper. Read next Tesla v9 to incorporate neural networks for autopilot Alphabet’s Waymo to launch the world’s first commercial self driving cars next month UK researchers have developed a new PyTorch framework for preserving privacy in deep learninglast_img read more

Jair Pérez of Jacó takes 1st place in World Surf League qualifier

first_imgThe Essential Costa Rica Pro Qualifying Series from the World Surf League kicked off Sunday when 64 men and 16 women from all over Central America participated in two days of trials. The first three men and one woman earned wildcard spots in the actual contest, which takes place in Playa Esterillos on Oct. 5 to 9.In waves of 3-5 feet at Playa Hermosa, Jacó’s Jair Pérez won 1st place and earned his place on the QS. He will begin in Round 64 of the contest, which will feature 192 competitors from all around the world. Those competitors on the QS are working to earn points, enough to get to the top 10 in the rankings. Those top 10 will then be eligible to compete on the World Championship Tour (WCT), against the likes of Kelly Slater of the United States, Gabriel Medina of Brazil and John John Florence of Hawaii — and more — for the chance to become a professional world champion, or simply for good money and international recognition.For most Costa Rican surfers, the QS is an unobtainable dream, as a lack of sponsors and money prevent them for traveling to other locations on that circuit. With a QS date in Costa Rica, the select few who won the trials will get a chance to compete in a professional contest, earn some points, and hopefully draw attention from sponsors. (Courtesy of Johan Pacheco)“There were a lot of surprises at the trials, because top names like Anthony Fillingim (current national champion from Malpaís), Gilbert Brown (four-time national champion from Puerto Viejo) and Luis Vindas (former national champion) were defeated in the quarterfinals of the men’s heats,” said Diego Naranjo of Orange Wave Productions, the organizer of the Essential Costa Rica Pro QS3000 WSL. “This was a big opportunity for the local surfers to get in the WSL QS3000 through the trials. Now they have the chance to surf against the best surfers from around the world here in their own country.”Joining Pérez will be Tamarindo’s Isaac Vega, who will start in Round 96, and Venezuela’s José Joaquín López, whose journey begins in Round 144.Jacó’s Jason Torres did not need to compete in the trials, as he was already awarded a wildcard spot to compete in the QS here after his championship win in the Costa Rica Pro Surfing Tour last year.The surprise winner at the trials this weekend was Camila Summers, a new face in Costa Rica competition. She will begin in Round 48 of the women’s competition of the Essential Costa Rica Pro QS3000 WSL. (Courtesy of Johan Pacheco)“Camila is only 14 years old and part of the new generation that are coming from Puerto Viejo,” said Naranjo. “She just surfed better than other girls, and surfed the best waves of the final heat.”Orange Wave awarded “phenomenal” 12-time Costa Rica national women’s champion Lisbeth Vindas of Jacó a wildcard, as well as one for Emily Gussoni of Jacó for being “a great promise of national surfing.”The more famous Costa Rican surfer names like Carlos Muñoz of Esterillos and Noe Mar McGonagle are already competing on the QS circuit and will, for sure, be here to do their part to raise their points on the rankings. Right now, Muñoz is No. 39 and McGonagle is No. 103 out of the 1,186 surfers on the QS. The Essential Costa Rica Pro Qualifying Series of the World Surf League got underway Sunday in Playa Hermosa. (Courtesy of Johan Pacheco)“We’ve been waiting for this to happen for a long time and it’s basically a dream come true,” McGonagle said. “It’s always good to compete in my home country and this brings a lot of opportunity to our surfers, especially to demonstrate their level of surfing and for the Latin American surfers in general to earn QS points. I’m not super familiar with the wave, living far from Esterillos, but I do know the waves are fun and consistent — it’s really exciting.”Alongside her brother Noe Mar, Leilani McGonagle will be one to watch in the Women’s QS3000 event as a local favorite. By the time she gets to Esterillos, she will have finished a full summer of competing in California. It is a chance the young Costa Rican relishes and will look to take full advantage of to earn valuable points.“It’s so amazing to have this opportunity and I can’t wait,” Leilani said. “It’ll be great to see more of the Ticos that don’t get to travel as much and will have a chance to showcase their talent. I love watching my brother compete and it’s always nice to have his support, so I will be looking forward to having him and my dad coach me. I love traveling, but it does get stressful so I’m so excited for this event and only having to drive a few hours from home is going to be awesome.”Currently, Leilani sits at No. 90 (out of 355) on the women’s QS rankings.Like the actual contest in October, the trials format ran four-person heats to start, then finished up with man-to-man heats. While this weekend had 64 men and 16 women from around Central America looking for a wildcard spot, the QS has 144 men (15 alternates) and 48 women (10 alternates) going for the cash prizes and points.“This type of competition for athletes, who for various reasons cannot participate in the WSL international tour, is very valuable. The power gained with points in this country’s QS will help them make important steps within the WSL. This is a great opportunity for all, even more so for new generations in this sport,” said Naranjo.“Now, with the commitment of the Costa Rica Tourism Board and private companies, we are able to show the audience a real surfing lifestyle with music, food court, and a beautiful beach. This beach is very contestable on all different tides and we can’t wait to show this paradise to the world.” Facebook Comments Related posts:Costa Rica’s Esterillos Este kicks off World Surf League event Team Costa Rica shines on first day of 2016 World Surfing Games Costa Rica’s national team departs for World Surfing Games in France Leilani McGonagle wins bronze medal at World Surfing Gameslast_img read more

Western Europe sweats and enjoys unusual heat wave

first_img Here’s how to repair and patch damaged drywall Arizona families, Arizona farms: providing the local community with responsibly produced dairy A mass of hot air moving north from Africa has sent temperatures spiking in Spain, Portugal, Britain and France in recent days.Britain’s Met Office, the weather forecasting service, said Wednesday was the hottest July day since records began in the 1800s based on the 36.7 C (98 F) recorded at London’s Heathrow airport.At Wimbledon, even an Australian like Bernard Tomic complained of dizzying heat: temperatures hovering near 34 degrees made it one of the hottest days on record at the tournament.Forecaster Meteo France said Paris reached 39.7 C, the highest temperature recorded in July since 1947, and the second-highest since record-keeping began in 1873.At Disneyland Paris, Mickey and Minnie and the gang got more frequent breaks. Cast members who don the costumes of the famed characters saw their on-stage rotations shrunk by a third to 5 minutes at a time, to spell them more often from the heat, a spokeswoman said.France’s national railway operator said the soaring heat had caused a disruption to some traffic in and out of Paris’ Saint-Lazare train station. The Energy Ministry reported some overnight electricity outages and fires as a result of swooning temperatures. New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies At Paris’ Gare de Lyon train station, public announcements repeatedly reminded people to drink lots of water and not over-exert themselves. Medics were on call in case of emergencies.French officials said the heat wave was just beginning. On Tuesday, southwest France saw temperatures reaching 42 C (107 F) and Cordoba in southern Spain recorded nearly 44 C (111 F).“We have a lot of heat-wave days ahead of us,” Gourand said, noting that a wide swath of southern France from Toulouse to Lyon was facing heat of up to 41 C (105 F) until the middle of next week.Climate is on many French minds for another reason. Paris is hosting a major international climate conference in December that will aim to curb heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions.In Britain, many commuters outside the London subway weren’t bothered by the sweltering heat. Some responded with a classic British quip: “Mustn’t complain.”“I’m loving it. I can’t complain,” said Maggie Cloud, a university student who planned to relax in the park. “We pay so much money to go abroad to holidays, and now we have the weather here. It’s cheaper.”In Spain, tourists looking for sun and beach time didn’t mind the heat either. “Beautiful. We’re coping very well,” said Petroneo Zaldumbide, a 65-year-old Ecuadorean on holiday.Spanish authorities said the past week brought record June temperatures, with Madrid recording its highest temperature in 95 years as thermometers came close to 40 C (104 F).Portugal, which is bracing for a challenging forest fire season after an exceptionally dry winter and spring, had the hottest, driest June for 12 years.The Civil Protection Service said more than 9,700 firefighters, 2,000 vehicles and 45 aircraft would be on permanent standby this season. Some 230 fire lookout towers across the country will also be staffed by unemployed people.___Sylvia Hui in London, Jorge Sainz in Madrid and Angela Charlton in Paris contributed to this report.Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Top Stories Comments   Share   Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Arizona families, Arizona farms: working to produce high-quality milk Mesa family survives lightning strike to home Children play in the fountains at Andre Citroen square in Paris, France, Tuesday, June 30, 2015. A mass of hot air moving north from Africa is bringing unusually hot weather to Western Europe, with France the next in line for a scorching day. (AP Photo/Kamil Zihnioglu) PARIS (AP) — Joggers wheezed, electric wires warped, and Britain sweated through its hottest July day on record as a wide swath of Western Europe sweltered in a heat wave.Authorities in France and elsewhere, mindful that thousands died during a 2003 heat wave, reached out to the elderly, families and other vulnerable people on Wednesday to warn of health risks. Paris officials opened special air-conditioned rooms for the public. Sponsored Stories How Arizona is preparing the leader of the next generationlast_img read more

Rep Lauwers sponsors resolution honoring 10th annual Ag Day

first_imgState Rep. Dan Lauwers, at left, today participated in the 10th annual Ag Day at the state Capitol in Lansing.  Lauwers sponsored a resolution honoring the traditional event.  Joining Lauwers with the resolution are, from left, Dave Armstrong of Greenstone Farm Credit Services and Yale resident Jay Ferguson of the Michigan Soybean Association. Lauwers, member of the House Agriculture Committee, helped welcome more than 30 organizations representing Michigan agricultural products to the Capitol to discuss the importance of the industry. 19Mar Rep. Lauwers sponsors resolution honoring 10th annual Ag Day Categories: Lauwers News,Lauwers Photoslast_img read more

Rep Kahle to serve on key House committees

first_img26Jan Rep. Kahle to serve on key House committees Categories: Kahle News Legislator named vice chair of Workforce and Talent Development CommitteeState Rep. Bronna Kahle has been named by Speaker Tom Leonard to serve on four key House committees during the 2017-18 legislative session.Kahle, who is the former director of the Adrian Senior Center, was named the vice chair of the Workforce and Talent Development Committee.“I’m so honored to be given this opportunity,” Kahle said. “It’s a blessing to serve on committees where I can put my experience helping seniors and running a small business to work. Michigan has made progress over the last few years, but we still have more work to do help out the hard-working taxpayers of Lenawee County.”In addition to serving as vice chair of Workforce and Talent Development Committee, Kahle was named a member of the Health Policy; Family, Children and Seniors; and Tax Policy Committees.Kahle can be reached by phone at 517-373-1706, by email at BronnaKahle@house.mi.gov, or by mail at P.O. Box 30014, Lansing, MI 48909-7514.###last_img read more